Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to reference methods using function calls?

I thought I could try something like this:

function map(f,lst) {
// calling map method directly is fine.
    return lst.map(f)
}

function mapm(m,lst) {
// where m is a passed method
    return map( function(x) { return x.m() }, lst)
}

var list_a = [ [1,9],[2,8],[3,7],[4,6] ]
var list_b = mapm(pop,list_a)

>Uncaught ReferenceError: pop is not defined 
share|improve this question
    
What is pop here? It's not defined anywhere in your code –  zerkms Dec 18 '12 at 1:05
    
[1,2,3,4].pop() -> 4 –  The man on the Clapham omnibus Dec 18 '12 at 1:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try:

mapm( 'pop', list_a )
...
return x[ m ]();

If you really want to reference the function itself:

mapm( list_a.pop, list_a ); // or Array.prototype.pop
...
return m.apply( x );
share|improve this answer

You can use Function.prototype.call.bind to create a functional version of a method. This is referred to as "uncurrying this".

function map(f, lst) {
// calling map method directly is fine.
    return lst.map(f)
}

function mapm(m,lst) {
// where m is a passed method
    return map( function(x) { return m(x) }, lst)
}

var pop = Function.prototype.call.bind(Array.prototype.pop);

var list_a = [ [1,9],[2,8],[3,7],[4,6] ]
var list_b = mapm(pop, list_a)

If you need it to work in ancient browsers, you'll need to shim in bind:

if (!Function.prototype.bind) {
  Function.prototype.bind = function (oThis) {
    if (typeof this !== "function") {
      // closest thing possible to the ECMAScript 5 internal IsCallable function
      throw new TypeError("Function.prototype.bind - what is trying to be bound is not callable");
    }

    var aArgs = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1), 
        fToBind = this, 
        fNOP = function () {},
        fBound = function () {
          return fToBind.apply(this instanceof fNOP && oThis
                                 ? this
                                 : oThis,
                               aArgs.concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)));
        };

    fNOP.prototype = this.prototype;
    fBound.prototype = new fNOP();

    return fBound;
  };
}
share|improve this answer
    
bind isn't safe to use without declaring it –  zyklus Dec 18 '12 at 1:08
    
Sure it is, if you're in an ES5 environment -- in other words, any browser made since 2010. Not everyone has to support IE8. –  Nathan Wall Dec 18 '12 at 1:09
    
but enough people do that you shouldn't throw out solutions without a "this doesn't work in IE8" disclaimer –  zyklus Dec 18 '12 at 1:10
    
+1 very interesting! –  The man on the Clapham omnibus Dec 18 '12 at 1:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.