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Every few months I try to re-learn Cocoa because I have no real use for programming iOS other than as a hobby. I'm going back over the basics and looking at what's different with the dot notations; for instance, seeing how the API has been updated to do common tasks by default.

There is plenty of documentation, which is good, but can also be a bad thing when you want to get up and running quickly. While it is slowly coming back, I consider myself a born-again neophyte on the subject, so any help is appreciated.


header file:

@interface FooClass : NSObject
{
@private
    double foo;
}
@property (nonatomic) double foo;
@end

implementation file:

@implementation FooClass
@synthesize foo = _foo;
- (void) doSomething
{

}
@end

Inside the doSomething implementation, is it possible to have a local variable (e.g. bar) that is a pointer to the class's foo, such that when bar is get/set foo is updated (local alias)? I've tried variations of:

double bar = *self.foo;
double *bar = self.foo;
double *bar = *self.foo;
double *bar = &self.foo;

bar=5;

If so, what's the right syntax? Also, something is telling me this is a bad idea, so why might it be?


Edit: It looks like after some more searching I found something similar: objective-c: double pointers to property not allowed? Now, I'll try to make sense of it.

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closed as not constructive by Rob, Janak Nirmal, matt, Anup Cowkur, Deefour Dec 18 '12 at 5:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
@Rob: I liked your first (deleted) comment better. Especially since your "no offense" invites unnecessary down ratings. I realize there is a mistake, hence the reason for bringing it here, but you should realize it was mostly once valid syntax and was not a mistake a couple years ago (aside from some new additions). –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 2:36
    
No worries, I appreciate all the help. I was once a regular in the IRC channel, but thought this was a simple enough question to post on SO. It looks like I'm not going to be able to rely on the iTunesU video or my old iOS Programming books and will have to instead read the documentation. Thanks again –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 2:43
    
The use of the explicit ivar was perfectly valid syntax, just not common practice any more. It's no longer required and therefore best practice is to omit it, but it's not a deal breaker. If you have old code that uses that pattern, that's fine. The serious problem is the use of the @synthesize statement that synthesizes an ivar of a different name, which only illustrates why we don't use explicitly declared ivars any more. I've helped more than one person on S.O. track down a bug that was caused by precisely that mistake, which is why I react to it so strongly. –  Rob Dec 18 '12 at 2:45
1  
@Rob: After watching some of this WWDC video from the link you gave below, I see what you're saying now about how synthesize is no longer needed - neat stuff! –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 5:04
1  
The fact that this was closed after an answer was given is hilarious. Especially since it was closed by one of the people that answered the question. The question is cut-and-dry and has an answer that does not solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion If you think it should be closed, you should post a comment on how it could be improved to not satisfy one of those demands –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 8:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your example contains a mistake:

@interface FooClass : NSObject
{
@private
    double foo;
}
@property (nonatomic) double foo;
@end

This declares a property foo. It also declares an ivar (instance variable) foo, which one might assume was the ivar associated with the property of the same name.

@implementation FooClass
@synthesize foo = _foo;
@end

Unfortunately, the @synthesize statement says "synthesize the foo property and create an ivar called _foo for it." So, you now have two ivars, foo (which you created between the {} in the @interface), and _foo, which you just synthesized as the ivar associated with the foo property. That's not good that that you have the foo ivar floating out there, which was explicitly declared, leading the reader to assume that it would be associated with the property of the same name, but it's not, because _foo is.

Long ago, you would have been advised to fix your explicit ivar declaration, e.g.

@interface FooClass : NSObject
{
@private
    double _foo;
}
@property (nonatomic) double foo;
@end

But even better now, it's advised that you omit the explicit ivar definition for a property altogether, and let the @synthesize statement create that ivar for you, eliminating any possibility of the problems we describe above, e.g., simply:

@interface FooClass : NSObject
@property (nonatomic) double foo;
@end

Furthermore, the @synthesize statement is now optional, and if omitted, it will end up doing precisely what you suggested @synthesize foo = _foo;.

And in answer to your question about about having a variable to access your property, that's what the _foo instance variable is. Why do you need another variable? And, besides, you should generally use the getter.

It's generally advisable to not use the ivar for setting the property, but rather use the property's accessor. This counsel would apply to any attempts to change the value of the property through a local variable, too. The only time you absolutely should be using the ivar is in your initializer and dealloc methods.

By the way, that reference to "Use Accessor Methods to Set Property Values" is a roundabout answer to your main question (at least if you were ever tempted to use that local variable to change the value of the property). You should only be using the object setter accessor for changing a property's value. The setter does important stuff that it would be unwise to bypass. To answer your final question would be, in effect, instructing you how to do the wrong thing in a way that doesn't generate a compiler warning, and thus I hesitate to go there.

Some relevant references include:

share|improve this answer
    
The documentation I found varied. One said @synthesize foo; would create an instance variable of foo another said it would create _foo. So, I thought being specific wouldn't hurt. –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 2:00
    
I'm trying to reuse old code to determine what's changed, but I admit, I'm also trying to do some new things too, which is a bad idea when re-learning (and I may have tried to do the same thing before - who knows?). In any case, I'm not sure why I set a private variable to the class, but if I keep the {...} (I have other un-related definitions there) and remove the declaration, will it still work? –  vol7ron Dec 18 '12 at 2:03
    
I didn't touch on the private variable in your class, but the emerging convention is to define those in the private class extension in your .m file. –  Rob Dec 18 '12 at 2:28
    
If you're working with old code, you'll have to make up your mind, but my answer above pretty much summarizes current conventional thinking (have property, synthesize ivar using underscore, don't declare the ivar for properties explicitly, use setter when changing properties, etc.). In terms of how much of the old practices you want to excise from old code, that's up to you. I'm pretty aggressive in cleaning up old if I have to touch the code for any reason, because it generally only makes it easier to maintain, but it's completely up to you. –  Rob Dec 18 '12 at 2:32
1  
@vol7ron: “One said @synthesize foo; would create an instance variable of foo another said it would create _foo.” Probably not; the truth is that @synthesize foo will create an instance variable named foo, whereas implicit synthesis (i.e., not saying @synthesize foo at all) will create an instance variable named _foo, the same as if you had said @synthesize foo = _foo;. –  Peter Hosey Dec 18 '12 at 9:15

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