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Alright, so I'm learning C++ and one of the challenges was to make a program that counts down from 10 to -5.. it's always going from 9 to 1, and it says Done!

Please help me in any way you can, and here's the code:

/*
*
*   Negative Example
*
*/
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int main()
{
signed int i = 10;
    for(i <= 10 && i != (0 - 5); --i;) {
        using std::cout;
        cout << i << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "Done!" << std::endl;
}

The output: 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Done!

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closed as too localized by dasblinkenlight, jogojapan, Tony D, Ram kiran, Rob Kennedy Dec 18 '12 at 3:44

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Review the parts of a for loop. –  chris Dec 18 '12 at 2:25
7  
A for-loop must have three three parts: for (initialization ; condition ; step). In your code, the step is the second one, and the third one is empty. –  jogojapan Dec 18 '12 at 2:25
    
What's the initialization, defining a variable within the loop? –  Adam Orama Dec 18 '12 at 2:27
    
Yes. You can skip it by just putting a semicolon. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Dec 18 '12 at 2:28
    
Yes. But if you declare/initialize the variable before the loop, you can leave the first part empty as well. In that case it becomes for ( ; i > -6 ; --i). –  jogojapan Dec 18 '12 at 2:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue with your code is that you have misplaced the parts of the for loop. As it is, the loop begins by evaluating the condition, and then proceeds to decrement i each time through, and check that this i is not equal to zero. The fact that your code completes is a consequence of the fact that --i will evaluate to 0 (false) if i == 1.

Your code should look like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int main()
{
    // Move the variable initialization to the first part of the loop
    signed int i;

    // Note the difference in where the expressions are placed
    // relative to the semicolons.
    for(i = 10; i <= 10 && i != (0 - 5); --i) {
        using std::cout;
        cout << i << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "Done!" << std::endl;
}
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Thanks! You're the answer! –  Adam Orama Dec 18 '12 at 2:34
    
@AdamOrama No problem! By the way, you're allowed to write things like -5 instead of (0 - 5). Also, it's considered good practice to write i > -5 rather than i != -5. –  Istvan Chung Dec 18 '12 at 12:56

As @jogojapan suggests, you want to rewrite

 for(i <= 10 && i != (0 - 5); --i;) {

as

for(i = 10 ; i != (0 - 5); --i) {

preferably as (although no difference functionally)

for(i = 10 ; i > - 5; --i) {

You can also define i within the loop body itself, if it is not needed before or after it, like so

for(int i = 10 ; i > - 5; --i) {

Edit: Change i>-5 to i>=-5 if you want the loop to run with i=-5 as well.

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for(i = 10 ; i > - 5; --i) Not working.. –  Adam Orama Dec 18 '12 at 2:33
    
@AdamOrama Not working meaning? Is it missing the -5 and you need the -5? –  Karthik T Dec 18 '12 at 2:35
for(i <= 10 && i != (0 - 5); --i;) {

You have those statements in the wrong place, it should be:

for(;i <= 10 && i != (0 - 5); --i) { // or (0 - 5 - 1) if you want -5 as well

The reason it's starting at 9 and terminating at 0 is because you're using --i as the continuing condition.

That condition has a side-effect that it decrements i before the loop body runs (ie, starts at 9) and it will be false the instant it hits 0.

For a better understanding, consider for (x;y;z):

  • x is performed once before the first iteration.
  • y is is evaluated before each loop iteration and, if true, the loop continues (false means the loop exits).
  • z is performed after each iteration of the loop.

Of course, if you want a loop that counts from 10 to -5 (inclusive), just use:

for (int i = 10; i >= -5; i--)

and stop messing about with dodgy code :-)

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I think you mismatched the middle term. The foreach loop as 3 terms inside the parenthesis and even if you dont use them, you still need 2 semicolons. Your middle term is currently --i which will return false only when i is 0.

Also, the for loop in C++ unlike C has a different initialization portion to the for loop whereas in C, you have declare like this . . .

int i;
for (i=0; i < 10; ++i)

In C++ you can declare the variable inside of the loop as such . . .

for (int i=0; i < 10; ++i)
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