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I would like to use decltype to virtually bind the return type of a method to a type of a variable like that

#include <iostream>

decltype(a) foo()                     // my point
{
  return 4.3f;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  auto a = 5.5f;
  std::cout << foo() << std::endl;
  return(0);
}

but this code doesn't compile under g++-4.7.2 on Linux as you can easily guess.

There is a workaround for this ? I know auto but this is not what i would like to use ( I do not want to use auto for the return type of foo()) .

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "virtually binding the return type"? Do mean virtual as in virtual functions? I.e. are you talking about some sort of run-time (late) binding? –  jogojapan Dec 18 '12 at 3:02
    
@jogojapan "virtual" as "normal people" think of, i mean that foo should express the same return type as a –  user1797612 Dec 18 '12 at 3:03
1  
To tie the type of a and return type of foo together, wouldn't it make sense to introduce a type synonym for both? –  Luc Danton Dec 18 '12 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What exactly is your goal here? Is it ok to pass the variable in to the function? If not, how is the function expected to know what type to use? If you are ok with passing the variable in to the function, you can use a template:

template<typename T>
T foo(T) {
    return 4.3f;
}

Now you can call it like

std::cout << foo(a) << std::endl;

The variable here is only being used to get its type. If you don't want to pass the variable in, then you need to provide the type directly, e.g.

template<typename T>
T foo() {
     return 4.3f;
}

std::cout << foo<decltype(a)>() << std::endl;

But this is, of course, quite ugly.

Now, if you are willing to use macros, you can simplify this slightly:

template<typename T>
T _foo() {
    return 4.3f;
}
#define foo() _foo<decltype(a)>()

std::cout << foo() << endl;

but of course this does hard-code the name of the variable that must be in-scope when you call foo().


The fundamental issue here is the function cannot implicitly use the type of the variable, as the function is declared first. So if templates are not a good solution, then the only alternative is to declare the type somewhere that both the function and the variable can access it. This can be accomplished with a typedef:

typedef float atype;

atype foo() {
    return 4.3f;
}

int main() {
    atype a = 5.5f;
    std::cout << foo() << std::endl;
}

Alternatively, you can simply decide that the return value of foo() is considered the authority on the type in question:

float foo() {
    return 4.3f;
}

int main() {
    decltype(foo()) a = 5.5f;
    std::cout << foo() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
my point is just using decltype before the declaration of the variable that is used as argument. I'm not asking to stick with the ISO standard, I was thinking that maybe some compiler could support a forwarded decltype with some hack. I have to rethink this, i will take a "no" as the answer, thanks anyway. –  user1797612 Dec 18 '12 at 3:15
    
@user1797612: I guess I still don't understand what you're actually asking for. You seem to want the compiler to somehow know what the return type of foo() should be, when that information is never given to it anywhere. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 18 '12 at 3:17
1  
@user1797612: Well yes, the function is indeed declared before the variable. Which is why you need some mechanism to pass the type of the variable back to the function. This can be done with templates as illustrated. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 18 '12 at 3:24
1  
templates do what you want and this keyword doesn't, it just looks like it does, but as you can see, you won't make decltype work for you. –  Luke B. Dec 18 '12 at 10:54
1  
@user1797612: The fundamental issue here is, if the function is declared before the variable, it cannot implicitly use the variable's type. A third solution that hasn't been offered before is to typedef the type you want to use at the top, then use that typedef in both the function definition and the variable declaration. I'll update my answer with an example. –  Kevin Ballard Dec 18 '12 at 20:40

You could use templates

template <typename T>
T foo()
{
    return 4.3f;
}

and call it using foo<float>()

you can also use decltype if a is declared before the function, like this:

auto a = 5.3f;

decltype(a) foo()
{
   return 4.3f;  
}
share|improve this answer
    
For the template-based solution: You could actually say foo<decltype(a)>() instead of foo<float>(). –  jogojapan Dec 18 '12 at 3:04
    
so the answer is no ... –  user1797612 Dec 18 '12 at 3:05

With C++1y you will be able to do this:

#include <iostream>

auto foo()
{
  return 4.3f;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  auto a = 5.5f;
  std::cout << foo() << std::endl;
  return(0);
}

which you can already do with lambda functions.

This is implemented in g++-4.8 with the std=c++1y flag.

I answered here: C++11 auto and function return types

share|improve this answer
    
this is just a totally different thing, the auto keyword on foo() assigns the type based on the return type of foo() not on the type of a which is what i want. –  user1797612 Dec 18 '12 at 5:00
    
OK, I misunderstood. –  emsr Dec 18 '12 at 17:02
    
@user1797612: But it will act in an almost identical manner to what you're asking for in most cases. –  Mooing Duck Jun 13 '13 at 21:54

Is this what you're after? It should compile:

#include <iostream>

const float foo() 
{
  return 4.3f;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  decltype(foo()) a;
  a = foo();
  std::cout << a << std::endl;
  return(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
nope, my point is about giving more flexibility to the variable, not to the method. –  user1797612 Dec 18 '12 at 3:05

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