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Other than the preprocessor, how can I conditionally enable/disable explicit template instantiations?

Consider:

template <typename T> struct TheTemplate{ /* blah */ };

template struct TheTemplate<Type1>;
template struct TheTemplate<Type2>;
template struct TheTemplate<Type3>;
template struct TheTemplate<Type4>;

Under some compilation conditions, Type3 is the same as Type1 and Type4 is the same as Type2. When this happens, I get an error. I'd like to detect that the types are the same and not instantiate on Type3 and Type4 as in

// this does not work
template struct TheTemplate<Type1>;
template struct TheTemplate<Type2>;
template struct TheTemplate<enable_if<!is_same<Type1, Type3>::value, Type3>::type>;
template struct TheTemplate<enable_if<!is_same<Type2, Type4>::value, Type4>::type>;

I've diverted myself trying enable_if and SFINAE (and I believe I know why they fail), but only the preprocessor has worked (ugh). I'm thinking about putting the types in a tuple or variadic, removing duplicates, and then use the remainder for instantiation.

Is there a way to conditionally enable/disable explicit template instantiation based on template argument types?

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Is this a duplicate? stackoverflow.com/questions/11982012/… –  jogojapan Dec 18 '12 at 3:22
    
Does explicitly instantiating one class imply implicit instantiation of all base types? –  Ben Voigt Dec 18 '12 at 3:29
1  
@jogojapan - No, this explicit instantiation which is different from specialization. –  walrii Dec 18 '12 at 3:30
    
In fact, why is repeated explicit instantiation an error? –  Ben Voigt Dec 18 '12 at 3:31
1  
@BenVoigt it's an error for the same reason as multiple definitions of a function are an error: ODR violation. An explicit instantiation is not a template (with weak linkage), it's a class, so must only be defined once. –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 18 '12 at 10:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
template <typename T> struct TheTemplate{ /* blah */ };

template<int> struct dummy { };

template struct TheTemplate<Type1>;
template struct TheTemplate<Type2>;
template struct TheTemplate<conditional<is_same<Type1, Type3>::value, dummy<3>, Type3>::type>;
template struct TheTemplate<conditional<is_same<Type2, Type4>::value, dummy<4>, Type4>::type>;

This still produces four explicit instantiations, but they won't be duplicates in the case where Type3 is the same as Type1 (unless Type1 is dummy<3>!)

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sneaky, I like it :) –  walrii Dec 18 '12 at 20:21
    
The downside is that dummy must meet the requirements of TheTemplate or the instantiation will give an error, so dummy might need to have members added to it, or you could write a partial specialization of TheTemplate<dummy<N>> –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 18 '12 at 20:44
    
I guess this is a good use case for static if. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 18 '12 at 22:42
2  
Alternatively, you can switch on the template that you instantiate: template struct conditional<is_same<Type1, Type2>::value, details::TheTemplate<3>, TheTemplate<Type3>>::type::TheTemplate;. By calling the dummy template TheTemplate too, the injected class name of one of its specializations is called TheTemplate, so that you in both cases can access ::type::TheTemplate and instantiate whatever class type that is. Similar to stackoverflow.com/a/13332744/34509 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 18 '12 at 22:55
    
@Johannes Nice, I didn't think of that –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 19 '12 at 16:11

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