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List<Person> PList = new List<Person>();

PList.Add(new Person{ Name = "Bob", email = "Bob.b@blah.org" });

Basically this holds rows of duplicates from a file

What I'm trying to figure out is how to delete however many till there is only one instance of each person in the list.

My initial thought was using a for loop to run through and delete based on comparisons

for (int i = 0; i < List.length; i++)
{
    if (PList.position(i).name == PList.position(i++).name)
      if (PList.position(i).date is < PList.position(i++).date)
        "Then I will delete number 1" 
}

However, I am wondering if there is a better or simpler way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this

PList = PList.GroupBy (x => x.Name).SelectMany (x=>x.OrderBy(y=> y.Date).Take(1))

I have not executed the query.

Idea is to group first, then order the grouping after that take first of the each ordered group.

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The answer makes sense but how would I implement that in C#? GroupBy isn't a function of the List class? –  Skitlz Jan 2 '13 at 4:22
2  
This is extension method on IEnumerable<T>. Add using System.Linq namespace. –  Tilak Jan 2 '13 at 4:24

Use Distinct method and write appropriate implementation of GetHasCode and Equals methods of Person class.

public class Person : IEquatable<Person>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public string Email { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (obj.GetType() != GetType())
        {
            return false;
        }

        return Equals((Person)obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {    
            var hash = 17;

            hash = hash * 23 + (Name == null ? 0 : Name.GetHashCode());
            hash = hash * 23 + (Email == null ? 0 : Email.GetHashCode());

            return hash;
        }
    }

    public bool Equals(Person other)
    {
        if (other == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return Name == other.Name && Email == other.Email;
    }
}

Then call Enumerable.Distinct method.

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