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I have the following Nested structure in C. (64 bit)

    typedef struct {
        int a;
        int b;
        int c;
        struct {
            int ab;
            long bc;
        }
        int d;
    } Test;

I see that,
a = 4 bytes
b = 4 bytes
c = 4 bytes
padding1 = 4 bytes 
inner structure = 16 bytes ( 4 bytes for ab, 4 bytes padding, 8 bytes for bc)
d = 4 bytes
padding2 = 4 bytes

sizeof(Test) returns 40 bytes.

My questions:

  1. padding1 -> why is this 4 bytes? Is this because the inner structure itself should be aligned ?. ( Also, Is it aligned with 8 byte (long) or 16 byte (size of inner) boundary.? )

  2. padding2 -> Is this 4 byte padding because of max of alignment done inside the structure (which is 8) ??

Thanks,

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1  
You code doesn't compile. Please only post real compiled code that has been verified to produce the claimed results. –  Jim Balter Dec 19 '12 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. padding1 -> why is this 4 bytes? Is this because the inner structure itself should be aligned ?. ( Also, Is it aligned with 8 byte (long) or 16 byte (size of inner) boundary.? )

It's because the inner struct should be 8-byte aligned, so that the long can reliably be 8-byte aligned.

  1. padding2 -> Is this 4 byte padding because of max of alignment done inside the structure (which is eight) ??

It is there so that the size of the entire struct is a multiple of eight bytes, so that the inner struct can be suitably aligned on an eight-byte boundary.

In this particular case, the alignment requirements could be met with just four bytes of padding if an anonymous struct member could be treated differently from a free-standing struct, but 6.7.2.1

14 Each non-bit-field member of a structure or union object is aligned in an implementation-defined manner appropriate to its type.

forbids that. So to reduce the size of the struct, the programmer needs to rearrange it, move an odd number of int members past the inner struct (or make int ab; and long bc; direct members of Test without going through an anonymous struct).

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"the alignment requirements could be met with just four bytes of padding" -- No, they couldn't. Any struct containing bc must have the same alignment, so both the inner struct and outer struct must be long-aligned, requiring padding for c, ab, and d. –  Jim Balter Dec 18 '12 at 7:22
    
It's an anonymous struct, it never leaves the enclosing struct. Since you can't have any freestanding exemplars of it, why shouldn't the compiler treat them as separate direct members of the enclosing struct for layout purposes? –  Daniel Fischer Dec 18 '12 at 7:30
    
Aren't fields guaranteed to have strictly increasing addresses? –  Alan Stokes Dec 18 '12 at 8:27
    
@AlanStokes Yes, that's one of the few guarantees the standard makes about the layout. The "one" who could move the d member is the programmer, not the compiler. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 18 '12 at 9:14
    
@DanielFischer, anonymous or not shouldn't influence on the layout. The layout must be the same between different compilation units, even if the fields are named differently. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 18 '12 at 10:50

Padding is very platform and compiler dependent, even though the behaviour you see is very common.

In general (and this is not what the C standard says), the compiler aligns the members of a structure so as to reduce the number of memory accesses. In case of 64-bit x86, a memory access always fetches 8 bytes, aligned to the 64-bit boundary. In other words, if you access 1 byte at address 0x1010AA45, the CPU will actually fetch from (cache) memory 8 bytes at address 0x01010AA40.

In order to fulfil such rule, if a member is N byte long, the compiler typically rounds N to the next power of 2, and aligns the member to such size or 8 bytes on 64-bit platforms, whatever is smaller. Most compilers allow such rule to be tweaked though, via #pragma or configuration.

I believe your compiler adds Padding1 because it has a rule to align all structures to the 8 byte boundary, no matter how big they are. Alternatively, it could also introduce it because the inner structure is larger than 4 bytes, and it therefore needs to be aligned to 8 bytes.

Padding2 is probably introduced because you could make an array of struct Test. In order, to guarantee that all structures are correctly aligned to the 8 byte boundary - and not just the first item in the array - the padding at the end is defined.

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Given that the implementation aligns longs on 8-byte boundaries, all the padding is required by the C Standard ... both a and ab must be at offset 0 of the structs containing them, forcing 4 bytes after ab and after either a, b, or c, and there must be padding either before or after d for array element alignment. –  Jim Balter Dec 19 '12 at 21:11

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