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I'm trying to work out how to match across newlines with perl (from the shell). following:

(echo a b c d e; echo f g h i j; echo l m n o p) | perl -pe 's/(c.*)/[$1]/'

I get this:

a b [c d e]
f g h i j
l m n o p

Which is what I expect. But when I place an /s at the end of my regex, I get this:

a b [c d e
]f g h i j
l m n o p

What I expect and want it to print is this:

a b [c d e
f g h i j
l m n o p
]

Is the problem with my regex somehow, or my perl invocation flags?

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I think, using /s should do the job. However, you can also use [\S\s]* instead of .* –  Rohit Jain Dec 18 '12 at 6:53
    
@Rohit Jain: Not adequate: He's invoking Perl with the -p switch, and thus needs to enable slurp mode. –  DavidO Dec 18 '12 at 7:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

-p loops over input line-by-line, where "lines" are separated by $/, the input record separator, which is a newline by default. If you want to slurp all of STDIN into $_ for matching, use -0777.

$ echo "a b c d e\nf g h i j\nl m n o p" | perl -pe 's/(c.*)/[$1]/s'
a b [c d e
]f g h i j
l m n o p
$ echo "a b c d e\nf g h i j\nl m n o p" | perl -0777pe 's/(c.*)/[$1]/s'
a b [c d e
f g h i j
l m n o p
]

See Command Switches in perlrun for information on both those flags. -l (dash-ell) will also be useful.

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Compare perl -MO=Deparse -0e1 with perl -MO=Deparse -0777e1. Changed your code to use the latter. –  ikegami Dec 18 '12 at 12:29
    
That worked exactly, and for my actual use case rather than this contrived example, too. Cheers :-) Saved me from having to write something custom in Ruby. –  Sophistifunk Dec 18 '12 at 21:14
    
@ikegami herp. thanks. –  Josh Y. Dec 20 '12 at 5:17

The problem is that your one-liner works one line at a time, your regex is fine:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;

my $s = qq|a b c d e
f g h i j
l m n o p|;

$s =~ s/(c.*)/[$1]/s;

say $s;
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Actually your one-liner looks like this:

while (<>) {

     $ =~ s/(c.*)/[$1]/s;
}

It's mean that regexp works only with first line of your input.

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You're reading a line at a time, so how do you think it can possibly match something that spans more than one line?

Add -0777 to redefine "line" to "file" (and don't forget to add /s to make . match newlines).

$ (echo a b c d e; echo f g h i j; echo l m n o p) | perl -0777pe's/(c.*)/[$1]/s'
a b [c d e
f g h i j
l m n o p
]
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There's More Than One Way To Do It: since you're reading "the entire file at a time" anyway, I'd personally drop the -p modifier, slurp the entire input explicitly, and go from there:

echo -e "a b c d e\nf g h i j\nl m n o p" | perl -e '$/ = undef; $_ = <>; s/(c.*)/[$1]/s; print;'

This solution does have more characters, but may be a bit more understandable for other readers (which will be you in three months time ;-D )

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