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Our tutor has given us the following piece of code in a quiz and I'm at a loss to work out what is going on. In the absence of hearing back from her so far, can anyone throw any light on it? I haven't seen an expression like this so far in my programming study

var a = 3;
var b = 5;
var c = 7;
var d = 8;
var e;

e = a < b && c++ > d;

document.write(c);

answer is 7

e = a > b && c++ > d;

document.write(c);

answer is 8

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closed as unclear what you're asking by arttronics, phant0m, Old Pro, Brent Worden, Vote to Close Feb 27 at 4:13

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you supposed to figure out which of the two is the correct result? What is it that you don't understand? –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 7:09
    
A hint: first look at operator precedence and write out the implied parentheses. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 7:10
    
It is the other way round, isn't it? This is due to the truthy/false boolean expression, in the first example, the left part of the expression is truthy, thus the right part is evaluated and can is increased. In the second, the left part is falsy and the right part doesn't get evaluated –  C5H8NNaO4 Dec 18 '12 at 7:14
    
Leah, are you sure these are the results you get? I think that @Glutamat is right in that the first answer should be 8 and the second one should be 7. I wonder how 3 people who answered your question did not notice that?! –  ysap Dec 19 '12 at 4:44
    
@everyone. Oops, I switched around the answers when I wrote out the question above - I didn't notice, as I didn't understand what was going on in the first place. Nevertheless, your answers still all cleared up what was going on for me, thank you :) –  jewfro Jan 3 '13 at 21:56

3 Answers 3

var a = 3;
var b = 5;
var c = 7;
var d = 8;
var e;

e = a < b && c++ > d;

document.write(c);

the important part is c=7

e = a < b && c++ > d;

That makes c=8 (c++)

The second one e = a > b && c++ > d;

because a is not greater than b, Javascript doesnt work out the second part (as regardless of its result, e's result will be false)

So the second one should be 7 and the top should be 8 given the values you have given it

http://jsfiddle.net/ZYVrH/1/ as an example

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So on the second one, when a < b is true, it then checks to see if c++ > d (which is false). But because it gets this far, that means c is incremented? I guess what has confused me is that I didn't realise that a variable could be changed as part of a boolean expression –  jewfro Dec 18 '12 at 7:34
    
yes, c++ means c=c+1 so when the second part is evaluated, the variable is incremented. The second part is only evaluated when the first part is true. –  exussum Dec 18 '12 at 9:27
  1. a < b == true, javascript VM computes the next part of boolean expression and increases c variable.
  2. a > b == false, javascript VM don't computes the next part, cause there is no need to do that when the first argument of logical expression and is false.
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e = a > b && c++ > d;

condition like this- (exp1 && exp2), exp2 is never calculated when exp1 results in false. So in the expression above, u have a > b && c++ > d. As a is not greater than b so, c is never incremented even if there is ++ operator. So when you print c, its 7.

Whereas, e = a < b && c++ > d; as a is less than b, calculation goes forward to compute c++ > d, as a result c is incremented and its value is 8.

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Thank you, I didn't see this one, and just replied to the previous post asking if exactly this was the case. I wasn't aware that a value could be assigned to a variable as part of a boolean expression. And so e is a boolean - javascript automatically makes it a boolean because of the expression that follows (still getting my head around this dynamic typing) –  jewfro Dec 18 '12 at 7:37
    
@LeahThomas yes, the value can be changed as a part of expression. Increment operators are a way to achieve that. –  sans481 Dec 18 '12 at 7:41
    
I just didn't realise that kind of thing could happen in a boolean expression, I thought they just tested a condition. So would that apply to java too, out of interest? –  jewfro Dec 18 '12 at 7:43
1  
@LeahThomas Every expression produces a value, that's what expressions do: They combine values to give new ones. An if() doesn't want a comparison as condition, it wants a value. So yes, that applies to Java, too. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 8:27

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