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I have a Python script that needs to look for a certain file.

I could use os.path.isafile(), but I've heard that's bad Python, so I'm trying to catch the exception instead.

However, there's two locations I could possibly look for the file. I could use nested trys to handle this:

try:
    keyfile = 'location1'
    try_to_connect(keyfile)
except IOError:
    try:
        keyfile = 'location2'
        try_to_connect(keyfile)
    except:
        logger.error('Keyfile not found at either location1 or location2')

Or I could just put a pass in the first except block, and then have another one just below:

try:
    keyfile = 'location1'
    try_to_connect(keyfile)
except IOError:
    pass
try:
    keyfile = 'location2'
    try_to_connect(keyfile)
except:
    logger.error('Keyfile not found at either location1 or location2')

However, is there a more Pythonic way to handle the above situation?

Cheers, Victor

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you write a loop? -1 for not knowing the concept of a loop – Andreas Jung Dec 18 '12 at 7:28
4  
It's a perfectly valid question asking for a more pythonic method of doing so. I don't really think you can ding him for not thinking of looping. – Snakes and Coffee Dec 18 '12 at 7:31
up vote 10 down vote accepted
for location in locations:
    try:
        try_to_connect(location)
        break
    except IOError:
        continue
else:
    # this else is optional
    # executes some code if none of the locations is valid
    # for example raise an Error as suggested @eumiro

Also you can add an else clause to the for loop; that is some code is executed only if the loop terminates through exhaustion (none of the locations is valid).

share|improve this answer
    
I would add else: to the for block with error message that none of the locations matched. – eumiro Dec 18 '12 at 7:30
    
@ eumiro -- :) I was just writing it down. good idea. – root Dec 18 '12 at 7:35
    
+1. Also, you probably want to wrap this up in a function try_to_connect_one_of(locations) (although maybe with a better name…). – abarnert Dec 18 '12 at 8:33

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