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Can anyone tell me why does this not work for integers but works for characters? I really hate reg expressions since they are cryptic but will if I have too. Also I want to include the "-()" as well in the valid characters.

String.prototype.Contains = function (str) {  
    return this.indexOf(str) != -1;
};

var validChars = '0123456789';               

var str = $("#textbox1").val().toString();
if (str.Contains(validChars)) {
    alert("found");
} else {
    alert("not found");
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried casting it to a string? (string)intVar Edit: That probably doesn't work in javascript. – qwerty Dec 18 '12 at 7:58
1  
This function only returns 'found', if your textbox contains '0123456789' somewhere. What exactly are you trying to do? – Cerbrus Dec 18 '12 at 7:59
    
If you want to make it work for integers, you have add Number.prototype.Contains as well – Chris Li Dec 18 '12 at 8:01
    
@ChrisLee: str is already cast .toString();, so that shouldn't be necessary – Cerbrus Dec 18 '12 at 8:02
    
If you are trying to use this validations, I would recommend using regex as opposed to the contains . – ryadavilli Dec 18 '12 at 8:02

Review

String.prototype.Contains = function (str) {  
    return this.indexOf(str) != -1;
};

This String "method" returns true if str is contained within itself, e.g. 'hello world'.indexOf('world') != -1would returntrue`.

var validChars = '0123456789';               

var str = $("#textbox1").val().toString();

The value of $('#textbox1').val() is already a string, so the .toString() isn't necessary here.

if (str.Contains(validChars)) {
    alert("found");
} else {
    alert("not found");
}

This is where it goes wrong; effectively, this executes '1234'.indexOf('0123456789') != -1; it will almost always return false unless you have a huge number like 10123456789.

What you could have done is test each character in str whether they're contained inside '0123456789', e.g. '0123456789'.indexOf(c) != -1 where c is a character in str. It can be done a lot easier though.

Solution

I know you don't like regular expressions, but they're pretty useful in these cases:

if ($("#textbox1").val().match(/^[0-9()]+$/)) {
   alert("valid");
} else {
   alert("not valid");
}

Explanation

[0-9()] is a character class, comprising the range 0-9 which is short for 0123456789 and the parentheses ().

[0-9()]+ matches at least one character that matches the above character class.

^[0-9()]+$ matches strings for which ALL characters match the character class; ^ and $ match the beginning and end of the string, respectively.

In the end, the whole expression is padded on both sides with /, which is the regular expression delimiter. It's short for new RegExp('^[0-9()]+$').

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this looks like the best solution. Why doesn't indexOf work for integers, I see nothing anywhere on google or in any javascript documentation. – Fab Dec 18 '12 at 16:08
    
@Fab I've added some explanation why your current code isn't working as expected. Hope it helps. – Ja͢ck Dec 18 '12 at 16:16
    
ah, I see, thank you very much. – Fab Dec 18 '12 at 16:41

You are passing the entire list of validChars to indexOf(). You need to loop through the characters and check them one-by-one.

Demo

String.prototype.Contains = function (str) {  

  var mychar;
  for(var i=0; i<str.length; i++)
  {
    mychar = this.substr(i, 1);
    if(str.indexOf(mychar) == -1)
    {
        return false;
    }
  }

  return this.length > 0;
};

To use this on integers, you can convert the integer to a string with String(), like this:

var myint = 33; // define integer
var strTest = String(myint); // convert to string
console.log(strTest.Contains("0123456789")); // validate against chars
share|improve this answer
    
@Fab the code in my answer works on integers as well if you take it off the string prototype. You don't have to use prototype, using the same code you can have a function that takes the input string, and valid chars string. – MrCode Dec 18 '12 at 16:11
    
Thank you, this is actually what the ajax control toolkit does in the filteredtextbox extender. I thought I could make it more efficient by using indexOf, baffled why indexOf only works for letters in a string and not integers. – Fab Dec 18 '12 at 16:12
    
@Fab you can use the String() function to convert an integer to a string, if you want to use indexOf on it. – MrCode Dec 18 '12 at 16:13
    
I'm going to use this for the contains function so I don't have to remember the string can't contain integers but for what I'm trying to do I'll use regex since I'm basically creating a plugin I can use to restrict input of only valid characters using keypress. – Fab Dec 18 '12 at 16:14
    
I tried using String(), still doesn't work. – Fab Dec 18 '12 at 16:15

Assuming you are looking for a function to validate your input, considering a validChars parameter:

String.prototype.validate = function (validChars) {  
    var mychar;
    for(var i=0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if(validChars.indexOf(this[i]) == -1) { // Loop through all characters of your string.
            return false; // Return false if the current character is not found in 'validChars' string.
        }
    }
    return true;
};

var validChars = '0123456789';

var str = $("#textbox1").val().toString();
if (str.validate(validChars)) {
    alert("Only valid characters were found! String validates!");
} else {
    alert("Invalid Char found! String doesn't validate.");
}

However, This is quite a load of code for a string validation. I'd recommend looking into regexes, instead. (Jack's got a nice answer up here)

share|improve this answer

I'm only guessing, but it looks like you are trying to check a phone number. One of the simple ways to change your function is to check string value with RegExp.

String.prototype.Contains = function(str) {
    var reg = new RegExp("^[" + str +"]+$");
    return reg.test(this);
};

But it does not check the sequence of symbols in string.

Checking phone number is more complicated, so RegExp is a good way to do this (even if you do not like it). It can look like:

String.prototype.ContainsPhone = function() {
    var reg = new RegExp("^\\([0-9]{3}\\)[0-9]{3}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2}$");
    return reg.test(this);
};

This variant will check phones like "(123)456-78-90". It not only checks for a list of characters, but also checks their sequence in string.

share|improve this answer

Thank you all for your answers! Looks like I'll use regular expressions. I've tried all those solutions but really wanted to be able to pass in a string of validChars but instead I'll pass in a regex..

This works for words, letters, but not integers. I wanted to know why it doesn't work for integers. I wanted to be able to mimic the FilteredTextBoxExtender from the ajax control toolkit in MVC by using a custom Attribute on a textBox

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