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I have query related to fetch the count of a particular value in col1. But I am interested in limiting count upto 3, because in my program logic I am performing an IF condition:

Select val1,count(1) cnt from tab group by val1;

    IF cnt=0
       --do something
    ELSIF cnt=1
      --do something
    ELSIF cnt=2
      --do something
    ELSIF cnt>2
      --do something
    ELSE
      --do something
    END IF;

I don't want to keep on counting the values which are appearing more than 2 because its additional overhead on such a large table 'TAB'.

I want to count up to 3 and then tell oracle to stop counting anymore for val1.

e.g. I have a value Item001 in val1, and corresponding to val1 we have 27 components in another column val2. But when i run group by on val1, the query should count the occurrences of val1 upto 3, not above that. It should stop scanning the table any further when it has reached a count of 3. It should jump to other value in val1 to get its count.

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1  
Don't use count(1) -- count(*) is the correct syntax. –  David Aldridge Dec 18 '12 at 10:31
    
@DavidAldridge Please justify –  cyborg007 Dec 18 '12 at 11:00
    
I'd say that if you're going to deviate from the documented standard then the emphasis should be on the deviation being justified. docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/…, don't you think? Does count(1) improve on count(*) in some way? –  David Aldridge Dec 18 '12 at 11:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think that there are a limited set of circumstances in which it is worth doing this, but let's say that we do have a table T1 with an ID column, and another table T2 with the ID value in some number of times, and you only want to count up to 3 occurrences.

What you might try is:

 select id,
        (select count(*) from t2 where t2.id = t1.id and rownum <= 3) c_star
 from   t1

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!4/1ab50/1/0

However you should definitely benchmark that against a more regular counting method.

Edit: Just thinking about situations where this might be faster than a full count.

Let's say you have a small number (15?) devices, each generating ten messages per second that are inserted into a table partitioned by day, and unindexed. You want to check that each one is logging at least, say, twenty messages each day.

A full count of a partition is about 13 million rows, but because the count is limited to 20 rows per device you actually perform 15 full partition scans that are all going to terminate (via the rownum limit) after just a few rows have been scanned.

Of course if you have a device that has failed you'd end up with a full scan.

Anyway, that's just off the top of me head. I'm not saying it's a great idea, but it is possible.

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This is kind of query which I was looking for. Just a little modification that here i have t2 and t1 same. –  cyborg007 Dec 19 '12 at 12:31
    
I don't see how can this be faster than select val1, count(*) from table group by val1; –  Florin Ghita Dec 19 '12 at 13:00
    
@FlorinGhita I'm sure that there are situations where it would avoid accessing and counting data. It would depend a lot on cardinalities and indexing. –  David Aldridge Dec 19 '12 at 13:44
    
Sure, That's why exists rownum :) What I say is not the case of the OP. Partitions is what I've mentioned in my answer, but I think is not the case here. Anyway, I believe the question is poor specified and the user benefits from discover of rownum :) –  Florin Ghita Dec 19 '12 at 13:52
1  
And... +1 from me for helping the user someway :) –  Florin Ghita Dec 19 '12 at 13:54

Despite not understanding exactly was is your point with the count of just 3... I think you just have to count the occurrences of what you want and then you can perform your if as it it, however see if the following link information can help (don't know the Oracle version you have):

http://www.orafaq.com/faq/how_does_one_select_the_top_n_rows_from_a_table

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You can use rownum to limit your rows to max 3. If you use this then your select will stop after the 3rd row so you won't count 100000 rows are something like that.

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To cap the count at 3, do this:

select val1, if(cnt > 2, 3, cnt) cnt
from (select val1, count(1) cnt
from tab
group by val1) x
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Basically we are counting all the occurrences of val1 in the table. But i want to count upto 3 and then tell oracle to stop counting anymore for val1. e.g. I have a value Item001 in val1, and corresponding to val1 we have 27 components in another column val2. But when i run group by on val1, the query should count the occurrences of val1 upto 3, not above that. It should stop scanning the table any further when it has reached a count of 3. It should jump to other value in val1 to its count. –  cyborg007 Dec 18 '12 at 8:39
    
You cant do what you are asking. This is the closest you'll get. If you run this I think you'll find it performs quite well –  Bohemian Dec 18 '12 at 8:55

You should understand how Oracle reads data.

The engine asks for blocks of data from disk. It does not know what is in the next block. For example it does not know if there are more "Item001"s or there are new items. It should read the block - all rows in it. Then, counting one more Item001s or Item999s is nothing compared to time needed to get the block from disk.

This is because rows are not ordered in the table. The engine does not know that 'There are item001s and there are Item002s, etc', except you have a partitioned table on val1 but I'm almost sure that won't help you.

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Let me clear the database load while using the below 2 queries with an example of both: –  cyborg007 Dec 19 '12 at 12:37
    
1. select count(1) from oe_order_lines_all where org_id=1703; 15 recursive calls 0 db block gets 33269 consistent gets 33264 physical reads 2856 redo size 230 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client 278 bytes received via SQL*Net from client 2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client 0 sorts (memory) 0 sorts (disk) 1 rows processed –  cyborg007 Dec 19 '12 at 12:38
    
2. select count(1) from oe_order_lines_all where org_id=1703 and rownum<=3; 15 recursive calls 0 db block gets 8 consistent gets 0 physical reads 0 redo size 227 bytes sent via SQL*Net to client 278 bytes received via SQL*Net from client 2 SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client 0 sorts (memory) 0 sorts (disk) 1 rows processed –  cyborg007 Dec 19 '12 at 12:42
    
I don't understand what you ask to me in these comments, but the difference is clear bwtween them. The second query stops after 8 blocks because you asked only 3 rows. the first ask for all rows. This has almost nothing to do with your question. –  Florin Ghita Dec 19 '12 at 13:02
    
I am not asking any input from your end but just clearing the point that why unnecessary search all the table when I am just interested in values having up to 3 occurrences. See David's answer above. –  cyborg007 Dec 19 '12 at 13:12

Guess I'm not crazy :) Taste it.

select mgr, (next_empno + next2_empno + 1) cnt 
from (
  SELECT empno, mgr,
    FIRST_VALUE(empno) OVER (PARTITION BY mgr ORDER BY empno) first_empno,
    LEAD(SIGN(empno), 1, 0) OVER (PARTITION BY mgr ORDER BY empno) next_empno,
    LEAD(SIGN(empno), 2, 0) OVER (PARTITION BY mgr ORDER BY empno) next2_empno
  FROM emp
)
where first_empno = empno

It uses the standard scheme but here is SQLFiddle (very good service :))

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