Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Why this is possible

   Map <char[],char[]>F = new HashMap<char[],char[]>();
   char []R = {'J','K','L'};
   char []X = {'J','L'};
   F.put(R,X);

while this is not

   Map <char[],char[]>F = new HashMap<char[],char[]>();
   F.put({'J','K','L'}, {'J','L'});
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The correct syntax for the second example is:

F.put(new char[]{'J','K','L'}, new char[]{'J','L'});

When you use {'J', 'K', 'L'} outside an initializer, the compiler doesn't try to guess the type of the array. You have to state it explicitly.

Also note that, since array1.equals(array2) compares the addresses of two arrays, your HashMap will behave in ways you'll probably find surprising. Consider:

    Map<char[], char[]> F = new HashMap<char[], char[]>();
    F.put(new char[] { 'J', 'K', 'L' }, new char[] { 'J', 'L' });
    F.put(new char[] { 'J', 'K', 'L' }, new char[] { 'J', 'L' });
    System.out.println(F.size());

On my machine, this prints 2 even though the two keys consist of exactly the same characters.

share|improve this answer
    
You said it's "surprising" that the size of the 'HashMap' is 2,is this because HashMap doesn't keep identical entries? – giannis christofakis Dec 18 '12 at 8:43
    
@yannishristofakis: The two keys look exactly the same, yet both are preserved. – NPE Dec 18 '12 at 9:00

This is possible -

Map <char[],char[]>F = new HashMap<char[],char[]>();
F.put(new char[]{'J','K','L'}, new char[]{'J','L'});

{'J', 'K', 'L'} is an anonymous array without type which cause syntax mismatch.

share|improve this answer

{'J', ...} is not how you declare anonymous array, you have to explicitly declare the type that your array holds.

you probably want

    Map <char[],char[]>F = new HashMap<char[],char[]>();
       F.put(new char[]{'J','K','L'}, new char[]{'J','L'});
share|improve this answer

You have to explicitly specify type of the operands as:

Map <char[],char[]>F = new HashMap<char[],char[]>();
F.put(new char []{'J','K','L'}, new char []{'J','L'});

and this will work.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.