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I was wondering if there is a way i can write the .h file a function prototype, and in the implementation to change the signature, so it will be slightly different from the prototype.

The reason that i want to do it is because there is some #include of an enum type that i dont want to do in the .h file, but only in the .c file, and the enum is part of the function's signature, so i was wondering if i can write the enum as a INT (enum and int are basically the same..) or something in the prototype, but then i get a compilation error.. Is there a nice way i can do it ?

Thanks in advance..

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Yes, use private constant #defines instead of an enum. –  cdleonard Dec 18 '12 at 9:03
    
What do you mean ? –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

I'll outline how to create a forward-declaration header. This technique may be familiar from <iosfwd>, which forward declares useful things from <iostreams>. Note that only C++11 lets you forward declare an enumeration.

huge_header_with_e.h
enum E { Zero, One, Two };

great_lib_fwd.h
enum E;
void f(E);

great_lib.h
#include "great_lib_fwd.h"
#include <huge_header_with_e.h>
void f(E e);

great_lib.c++
#include "great_lib.h"
void f(E e) { /* do something with e */ }

other_client.h
#include "great_lib_fwd.h"
void other_client(E);

other_client.c++
#include "other_client.h"
#include "great_lib.h"
void other_client(E e) { /* use e */ }

Note that in very limited contexts like other_client.h, inclusion of the huge_header_with_e.h is still avoided.

In practice, I suspect you'll find your client code often needs to specify particular enumeration constants, and will need to include huge_header_with_e.h anyway, so relatively few translation units will avoid the dependency.

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If I understood correctly, you can always make a wrapper function, eg.

file.h

void DoSomething(int i);

file.cpp

void DoSomething(int i)
{
    ActuallyDoSomething((MyEnum)i);
}

static void ActuallyDoSomething(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    // Do something
}

In case of OOP program, it may look like following:

file.h

class ISomething
{
    virtual void DoSomething(int i) = 0;
};

file.cpp

class Something : ISomething
{
private:
    void ActuallyDoSomething(MyEnum myEnum)
    {
        // ...
    }

public:
    void DoSomething(int i)
    {
        ActuallyDoSomething((MyEnum)i);
    }
}

Edit: In response to comment: I would suggest providing a function overload then.

file.h

void DoSomething(int i);
void DoSomething(MyEnum myEnum);

file.cpp

void DoSomething(int i)
{
    DoSomething((MyEnum)i);
}

void DoSomething(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    // Do something
}

Final edit: This solution should work without need of use of C++11.

file.h

#pragma once

enum MyEnum;

void DoSomething(int i);
void DoSomething(MyEnum enum);

FileWithMyEnum.h

#pragma once

enum MyEnum
{
    One,
    Two,
    Three
};

file.cpp

#include <file.h>
#include "FileWithMyEnum.h"

// Implementations
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If anybody is wondering about performance impact, any decent compiler will optimize it with -O2. And indeed using static keyword is much better and also help the compiler optimization :-) –  benjarobin Dec 18 '12 at 9:05
1  
ActuallyDoSomething should probably be marked static. –  Pubby Dec 18 '12 at 9:06
    
Yea, i thought about it, but i forgot to mention, i still want to call this function with enum type and not with INT .. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:16
    
You want to have only one prototype and call with different parameters? –  Spook Dec 18 '12 at 9:20
    
Hmm, well i dont really care how many prototypes there are, as long as i can the finction with enum as param, and i dont have to include the enum type in the .h file where the prototype is declared .. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:24

Not really. In C++11, you can use an opaque enum declaration in the header, so that you don't have to specify the enum constants, but generally, an enum is light enough, and doesn't usually introduce any additional dependencies, so there is no real argument against including it wherever needed.

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1  
Yea, but the #include consists more things beside the enum, so i dont want to include it in the .h file, but only in the relevant .cpp file.. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:21
    
@gal If the enum is at namespace scope, what's to prevent you from splitting it out into its own header file? (If it's at class scope, there's not much you can do; you can't name the enum without the definition of the class being visible.) –  James Kanze Dec 18 '12 at 9:41
    
I cannot change the existing usage of the enum .. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:53

If it is C++, you could use function overloading, I guess.

file.h

void DoSomething(int i);

file.cpp

void DoSomething(MyEnum myEnum)
{
    // Do something
}

void DoSomething(int i)
{
    DoSomething((MyEnum)i);
}

I haven't used C++ for a while. So, not 100% sure if this would work as expected.

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Yea, looks good, but the problem is that i still want to call this function with enum type, and not with int .. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:25
    
So you want that the prototype should be with int & strictly NOT with enum, but all calls would be with enum? –  anishsane Dec 18 '12 at 9:28
    
yes, i want that the calls will be done with enum, and the prototype file wont include the the enum file. –  gal Dec 18 '12 at 9:33

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