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I have a file with several XML tags like such:

<Good>Yay!</Good>
<Great>Yup!</Great>
<Bad>booo</Bad>
<Bad>
<Ok>not that great</ok>
</Bad>
<Good>Wheee!</Good>

where I want to get rid of the "Bad" tags and anything in between. So it would turn into just:

<Good>Yay!</Good>
<Great>Yup!</Great>
<Good>Wheee!</Good>

I know this one-liner:

perl -pe "undef $/;s/<Bad>.*?<\/Bad>//msg" < originalFile > newlyStrippedFile

Seems to do everything I want (aside from putting extra newlines in, but hopefully I can deal with that easily enough)

But I need to put it in a script (two files are read into the command line, one with all the tags, the other with a list of tags to pull out), so the same thing is going to be called several times.

And I'm just having trouble. Either it's only ever reading one line or I get errors or both.

Here is the relevant portion of my latest attempt:

open ORIGINAL_FILE, $sdb_pathname
  or die "Can't open '$sdb_pathname' : $!";

@sdb_input_array = <ORIGINAL_FILE>;  

close ORIGINAL_FILE;
@sdb_input_scalar=join("",@sdb_input_array);

foreach $tag (@tags) {
  &remove_tag($tag);
}

sub remove_tag 
{
   my($current_tag) = @_;

   $sdb_input_scalar  =~ s/<$current_tag>.*?<\/$current_tag>//msg; 

   open NEWLY_STRIPPED_FILE, $clean_sdb_pathname
     or die "Can't open '$clean_sdb_pathname' : $!";

   print(NEWLY_STRIPPED_FILE $sdb_input_scalar);
   close(NEWLY_STRIPPED_FILE);  

}

This is giving me "use of uninitialized value $sdb_input_scalar in substitution (s///) at my $sdb_input_scalar =~ line. and Filehandle NEWLY_STRIPPED_FILE opened only for input

And of course my two files still look identical, as if I did nothing to them.

I'm sorry if I'm missing something obvious but I'm literally brand new to perl. Someone at work gave an 8-hour estimate to do this script and I've already used over 5 hours just installing perl, learning the syntax and getting the other aspects to go right. I know there is an XML::Parser module but I found the examples very overwhelming for the short time I have left to complete.

I have to assume my regex is correct because the one-liner works so nicely. Can anyone please help me adapt it to what I need it for?

share|improve this question
1  
don't use regexps for xml parsing –  gaussblurinc Dec 18 '12 at 9:44
    
and this is normal, because line '$var=~s/pattern/whatyouwant/;' is a substitution, which work WITH $var –  gaussblurinc Dec 18 '12 at 9:48
6  
ALWAYS use strict; use warnings; –  Toto Dec 18 '12 at 9:54
    
Downvoted for "problem solved by using strict". –  darch Dec 19 '12 at 22:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You really should use an XML parser. It's almost a guarantee that an XML file will not parse quite the way you expect it to with regexes. However, let's get you started first.

Where you have:

@sdb_input_scalar=join("",@sdb_input_array);

You actually want:

$sdb_input_scalar=join("",@sdb_input_array);

Now some other tips.

At the top of your script make sure you enable warnings with the -w flag like this:

#!/path/to/perl -w

use strict;

Once you add in the use strict it will cause you several errors, but that's a good thing. We're going to enforce some scope and other good practices. You now need to initialize variables (beginning with $, @, or %) with my. For example:

my @sdb_input_array = <ORIGINAL_FILE>;

or:

foreach my $tag (@tags) { ... }

Instead of calling open like you are, use the three arguement version:

open ($originalFile, "<", $sdb_pathname)
  or die "Can't open '$sdb_pathname' : $!";

my @sdb_input_array = <$originalFile>;

That will set it to read only. See http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/open.html

Generally you should avoid dependency on globals. Change how you call remove_tag():

foreach $tag (@tags) {
  $sdb_input_scalar = remove_tag($sdb_input_scalar, $tag);
}

To support this you need to change the function as well:

sub remove_tag 
{
   my($input, $current_tag) = @_;

   $input  =~ s/<$current_tag>.*?<\/$current_tag>//msg; 

   return $input;    
}

You can then write out once after you have iterated over all tags by moving this outside of the remove_tag function:

   open ($strippedFile, ">", $clean_sdb_pathname)
     or die "Can't open '$clean_sdb_pathname' : $!";

   print $strippedFile $sdb_input_scalar;
   close($strippedFile);
share|improve this answer
1  
Carp::Always –  gaussblurinc Dec 18 '12 at 9:59
    
One further suggestion: it would be better for remove_tag to accept the tag as the first argument. Then you could accept an array of lines as the remaining arguments. –  dan1111 Dec 18 '12 at 10:46
    
Alternatively you could set it to accept an array of tags. I almost added that in but thought I would keep it simple. –  Ilion Dec 18 '12 at 10:54
    
This was exceedingly helpful. I know I shouldn't use regex. Bad me. But I wanted to make sure I could get it done quick and dirty in the time I had allotted (and I couldn't even do that much, apparently), before getting lost in a foreign module. If it puts anyone at ease, the file I'm using really is just tags in angled brackets and that's it. None of them have special modifiers in them as well. Maybe it's not even XML really... I'm out of my element here; I'm used to ada. –  Evil Sock Lady Dec 18 '12 at 15:06
    
Glad to help. If you could click the check mark next to my answer to accept it that would be awesome. :) –  Ilion Dec 18 '12 at 16:45

Here is a solution using XML::Twig:

use warnings;
use strict;

use XML::Twig;

my $xml = XML::Twig->new(
    pretty_print  => 'indented',
    twig_handlers => {
            #Define a sub that will be called for all 'Bad' tags
            Bad => sub {
                $_->set_tag('Good'); 
        }
    }
);

$xml->parse(\*DATA);
$xml->print;

__DATA__
<xml><Good>Yay!</Good><Great>Yup!</Great><Bad>booo</Bad><Bad>
<Ok>not that great</Ok></Bad><Good>Wheee!</Good></xml>

XML::Twig also has parsefile() and parsefile_inplace() methods that take a filename directly and process it--just what you need.

There is a little bit of a learning curve with this method, but the benefits are great.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately Twig is not one of our approved libraries, but thanks for the clearer idea how the XML parser-type modules work. I'm going to need them in the future –  Evil Sock Lady Dec 20 '12 at 4:58

First: don't use regular expressions to deal with XML! Then, assuming the doubt from the question title, rather than the specific usage case. Your one-liner is better written as:

perl -0777 -pe "s/<(Bad)>.*?<\/\1>//msg" < originalFile > newlyStrippedFile

Now, use the Perl itself to "inflate" the one-liner:

perl -MO=Deparse -0777 -pe "s/<(Bad)>.*?<\/\1>//msg" > oneliner.pl

And this is what you get:

BEGIN { $/ = undef; $\ = undef; }
LINE: while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {
    s[<(Bad)>.*?</\1>][]gms;
}
continue {
    die "-p destination: $!\n" unless print $_;
}

Just add use strict; use warnings;.

share|improve this answer

This is a solution using XML::Twig. I have assumed that your XML document is well-formed and have wrapped the data you have shown in it in a <root> element to make it so.

The $twig object defines a single twig handler for <Bad> elements, which simply deletes the element if it appears during parsing.

Once the input has been parsed, $twig-print shows the residual XML.

use strict;
use warnings;

use XML::Twig;

my $twig = XML::Twig->new(
  twig_handlers => { Bad => sub { $_->delete } },
  pretty_print => 'record',
);

$twig->parse(<<'END_XML');

<root>
  <Good>Yay!</Good>
  <Great>Yup!</Great>
  <Bad>booo</Bad>
  <Bad>
    <Ok>not that great</Ok>
  </Bad>
  <Good>Wheee!</Good>
</root>

END_XML

$twig->print;

output

<root>
  <Good>Yay!</Good>
  <Great>Yup!</Great>
  <Good>Wheee!</Good>
</root>
share|improve this answer

This should do the trick:

    $tags=join("",@sdb_input_array);
    print "contents before : $tags \n";
    $tags =~ s/<Bad>.*?<\/Bad>//msg;
    print "content cleaned : $tags \n";

the tags variable should now not carry the "BAD" tags - the only issue will be that the tag lines will be left with a blank unfilled line so that you have blank lines in between the GOOD tag lines - but you can remove blank lines as your final step

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