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I'm trying to experiment with recursion so as to grasp the concept. It is language agnostic, so the same concept applies to both C# and Java.

I've got a TreeView which has a number of nodes. I would like to iterate through every single node and count the ones which satisfy a certain condition. If at any time the condition is not satisfied, I would like the algorithm to finally return -1.

Each TreeViewItem will only be considered if it has a Tag named "Condition" (there are 3 types of TreeViewItems in all - I will only consider the "Condition" ones).

Once a TreeViewItem is found to be of the "Condition" type, I would like to check to see that it satisfies a certain condition. As I mentioned before, even if only one TreeViewItem does not satisfy the condition, I want the algorithm to return -1 in the end.

If the algorithm does not return -1, I want it to return the amount of valid conditions which it has found - i.e. an integer is to be incremented each time a condition is successfully passed, and the final count is returned at the end.

This is what I've tried so far:

private int CountConditions(TreeViewItem item)
        {
            int conditionCount = 0;

            foreach (TreeViewItem child in item.Items)
            {
                int previousCount = CountConditions(child);

                if (previousCount == -1)
                {
                    return -1;
                }
                else
                {
                    return conditionCount += previousCount;
                }
            }

            if (item.Tag.Equals("Condition"))
            {

                if (/*Condition is not satisfied*/)
                {
                    return -1;
                }
                else
                {
                    return conditionCount++;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                return conditionCount;
            }
        }

My current algorithm does infact return -1 if a condition is not satisfied, however if conditions are satisfied it just returns 0, rather than the amount of valid conditions.

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This code cannot be both C# and Java at the same time. And this for sure is not Java. –  Rohit Jain Dec 18 '12 at 9:28
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is not a trivial recursion, since you have to handle both the error condition, and the normal condition. If you didn't have the error condition, and only needed to count the number of condition nodes, you could write:

private int CountConditions(TreeViewItem item)
{
    int currentCondition = CalculateCondition(item)
    int childCounts = 0;
    foreach (TreeViewItem child in item.Items)
    {
        int childCount = CountConditions(child);
        childCounts += childCount;
    }
    return currentCondition + conditionCounts
}

private int CalculateCondition(TreeViewItem item)
{
    if (item.Tag.Equals("Condition"))
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}        

But to handle the error, you have to have two checks for the error condition, one for the current node, and one for the child nodes, and return immediately, if you encounter the condition:

int error = -1

private int CountConditions(TreeViewItem item)
{
    int currentCondition = CalculateCondition(item)
    if (currentCondition == error) // new
        return error;              // new
    int childCounts = 0;
    foreach (TreeViewItem child in item.Items)
    {
        int childCount = CountConditions(child);
        if (childCount == error)   // new
            return error;          // new
        childCounts += childCount;
    }
    return currentCondition + conditionCounts
}

private int CalculateCondition(TreeViewItem item)
{
    if (item.Tag.Equals("Condition"))
        if (((item.Header as StackPanel).Children[2] as TextBox).Text.Equals("")) // new
            return error; // new
        else              // new
            return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}
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I'll give this one a try! –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 9:52
    
This seems to have done the trick! Many thanks for the assistance :) Could you kindly explain what I did wrong? Since it's a learning exercise after all :) –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 9:55
    
@DotNET : In your code, you set conditionCount to -1 if a child has conditionCount -1, but then you keep on checking the other children. If any of these remaining children have a valid conditionCount, you add that to the conditionCount, and then you lose the -1. If a child has a -1 conditionCount, then you should return that immediately. –  Boris Dec 18 '12 at 10:08
    
Thanks Boris. +1! :) –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 10:18
    
@Boris How so? He returns -1 if any of the children produce -1, he doesn't continue with the other children. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 10:27
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you use

return conditionCount++;

which is bad practice. for good reason. what happens here is a)return conditionCount (which you set to zero) b)increment conditionCount

b never happens as its after the return statement, so you always pass 0 to your next recursion step.

you can use

return ++conditionCount;

or the much better

conditionCount++;
return conditionCount;
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+1 the only correct answer. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 9:43
    
I've tried modifying it like you suggested, however (while it does return the correct count), it sometimes returns 0 when it should be returning -1. –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 9:45
    
look at the for each statement. as it is written it sets the count to -1 if ONE of the children has a -1 count. erasing the counts you added up until that child. –  Oren Dec 18 '12 at 9:52
    
also, your edit now makes all answers here irrelevant to the question. so maybe revert your edit and add a new question ? @DotNET –  Oren Dec 18 '12 at 10:08
    
Good idea @Oren –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 10:18
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You should return conditionCount; only at the end of the function. Only the return -1; have to be in the middle of the function.

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Since he's learning, it may be better to only provide hints. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 9:25
    
Since I'm still learning, do you mind explaining why? I can't seem to understand this concept. I'll try out your suggestion, but it would help immensely if you could explain why I should be doing that :) –  Dot NET Dec 18 '12 at 9:32
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return stops the whole function at once and returns a value. That's not what you want. You want to accumulate values and return the sum when you have finished.

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That's what I thought too, initially, but he wants to stop if at leat one item doesn't satisfy the condition, so it's ok to abort. –  phant0m Dec 18 '12 at 9:44
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I think you could simplify your code by using exceptions. What you do is you throw an exception when the condition fails which you can then catch in another function which starts of the recursion. This will automatically unwind the stack and abort the computation. The function which catches the exception can then return whatever you want it to.

Apart from this all you would have to do in the recursion is accumulate 1 for each passed condition.

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