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I've just started reading Microsoft .NET development. It includes lessons/labs using VB and/or C#. Now I got through the first lab using VB and am going to now do it in C#. I have copied everything out exactly (I'm pretty sure) but I get

Expected class, delegate, enum, interface, or struct

I think I should be getting a CMD saying

Tony Allen, age 32

Could anybody point out my problem here? I'm a back-end web developer (PHP) so I know about coding, I'm just new to this language (:

If you are going to edit the code below, could you please let me know what changes you made and why you made them? The more explaination the better!

Thanks!

C#

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    struct Person{
        public string firstName;
        public string lastName;
        public int age;
    }
    public Person(string _firstName, string _lastName, int _age){
        firstName = _firstName;
        lastName = _lastName;
        age = _age;
    }
    public override string toString(){
        return firstName + " " + lastName + ", age " + age;
    }
    class Program{
        static void Main(string[] args){
            Person p = new Person("Tony", "Allen", 32);
            Console.WriteLine(p);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Move struct initializer into struct definition. Same with other members.

  struct Person{
        public string firstName;
        public string lastName;
        public int age;

        public Person(string _firstName, string _lastName, int _age)
        {
            firstName = _firstName;
            lastName = _lastName;
            age = _age;
        }

        public override string ToString(){
            return firstName + " " + lastName + ", age " + age;
        }
    }

In C# we declare members inside class/struct definition, not like this done in C++. Please read this msdn guide on classes and structs in C#.

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1  
Also, C# is case sensitive so the toString override should be cased as ToString. –  Richard Everett Dec 18 '12 at 10:08
1  
@RichardEv thanks, didn't notice that when copy-pasted question code –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 18 '12 at 10:09
2  
Thanks man you've sorted it! - Also thanks to @RichardEv for pointing that out. –  George Dec 18 '12 at 10:10

Also, ToString is capitalized the wrong way, it should be

public override string ToString()
share|improve this answer
  1. Constructor and Methods should be declared within the class/struct:

    struct Person
    {
        public string firstName;
        public string lastName;
        public int age;
    
        public Person(string _firstName, string _lastName, int _age)
        {
            firstName = _firstName;
            lastName = _lastName;
            age = _age;
        }
    
        public override string toString()
        {
            return firstName + " " + lastName + ", age " + age;
        }
    }
    
  2. There is no method toString to override, but ToString

    struct Person
    {
        //...
    
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return firstName + " " + lastName + ", age " + age;
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
using System;

namespace Programs
{
    struct Person{
        public string firstName;
        public string lastName;
        public int age;

        public Person(string _firstName, string _lastName, int _age){
        firstName = _firstName;
        lastName = _lastName;
        age = _age;
    }

        public  string toString()
        {
            return firstName + " " + lastName + ", age " + age;
        }
    }


    class Program{
        static void Main(string[] args){
            Person p = new Person("Tony", "Allen", 32);
            Console.WriteLine(p.toString());
        }
    }
}
  • Use toString() method in your struct. You don't have to override it.
  • Use Console.WriteLine(p.toString()); not Console.WriteLine(p);
  • Get a good C# book that you can learn class and struct types basicly.
share|improve this answer
    
I think that the toString method was intended to be an override for ToString, but was just cased incorrectly by accident. –  Richard Everett Dec 18 '12 at 10:13
    
Hi there, where Console.WriteLine(p.toString()); is the .ToString completely vital? I'm reading through a book and it doesn't have it - is it wrong in the book or can it be done either way? –  George Dec 18 '12 at 10:15
    
@RichardEv Yeah. But if toString() method used in struct, overriding no need to use. –  Soner Gönül Dec 18 '12 at 10:16
    
toString() and ToString() is different in your case. P is a struct object, so Console.Writeline() doesn't have struct overloading, it works like an object. Because of that, you need yo use p.toString() in your case. For the books, I recommend you should read first CRL via C# 3rd edition. It's amazing. –  Soner Gönül Dec 18 '12 at 10:23
    
@F4r-20 In C#, toString and ToString will be two completely different methods, since C# is case-sensitive. The ToString method exists on all C# objects. Console.WriteLine(p) will cause this method to get called on p. By overriding ToString, you can provide your own implementation that will get called instead. For more information see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.object.tostring.aspx –  Richard Everett Dec 18 '12 at 10:24

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