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I'm trying to get float (18,16) with padding zeros to the right, but this isn't working because it always ends with a 1 instead of a zero. My guess it's because I've specified it wrong but I'm not sure how to do it correct.

Sample: 12.12234 must become 12.122340000000000 and 1.01 must become 1.01000000000000.

To achieve this I'm using sprintf('%18.016f', $fMyFloat); but this always ends with a 1 instead of a 0. Obviously I'm overseeing something, I just don't know what. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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1  
Split on the period, attack with str_pad? –  Charles Dec 18 '12 at 10:19
    
I've tried that and that works, but I figured it should be possible with sprintf as well. But I couldn't figure out how. It seems when you're floating over 9 digits behind the period it should be treated different. –  Ben Dec 18 '12 at 10:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This test code:

$data = array(
    12.12234,
    1.01
);
foreach($data as $fMyFloat){
    echo sprintf('%18.016f', $fMyFloat) . PHP_EOL;
}

... prints this in my 64-bit computer:

12.1223399999999994
1.0100000000000000

You are facing the well-known problem of floating point precision. Converting integers from base 10 to base 2 is pretty straightforward (and exact) but base 10 floating point numbers cannot always be represented exactly in base 2. This issue isn't specific to PHP but there's a warning in the PHP manual:

Floating point numbers have limited precision. Although it depends on the system, PHP typically uses the IEEE 754 double precision format, which will give a maximum relative error due to rounding in the order of 1.11e-16. Non elementary arithmetic operations may give larger errors, and, of course, error propagation must be considered when several operations are compounded.

Additionally, rational numbers that are exactly representable as floating point numbers in base 10, like 0.1 or 0.7, do not have an exact representation as floating point numbers in base 2, which is used internally, no matter the size of the mantissa. Hence, they cannot be converted into their internal binary counterparts without a small loss of precision

Your only chance to achieve such precision is to manipulate numbers as strings. PHP bundles two arbitrary precision libraries that can help you when you need to do match with strings: GNU Multiple Precision and BC Math. Here's a little hack with bcmath:

$data = array(
    '12.12234',
    '1.01'
);
bcscale(16);
foreach($data as $fMyFloat){
    echo bcdiv($fMyFloat, 1) . PHP_EOL;
}

It this case, though, you can probably use simple string functions:

$data = array(
    '12.12234',
    '1.01'
);
foreach($data as $fMyFloat){
    list($a, $b) = explode('.', $fMyFloat);
    echo $a . '.' . str_pad($b, 16, 0) . PHP_EOL;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your clear explanation. Wow. you know this stuff! This goes beyond my knowlegde and I wouldn't have figured this out. Thanks, +1 and accepted. Have a nice day sir. (And you're right, I'm going for the str_pad solution I had before (just like yours)). –  Ben Dec 18 '12 at 10:40

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