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I am trying to debug an application that is built from a number of shared libraries using GDB.

Start of gdb:

prompt$ gdb
GNU gdb (GDB) Red Hat Enterprise Linux (7.2-50.el6)
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/bugs/>.

Tell GDB the program to debug:

(gdb) file /home/me/build-path/my-program
Reading symbols from /home/me/build-path/my-program...done.

Set a breakpoint within the application:

(gdb) my-program-src.cpp:57
breakpoint 1 at 0x819df9b: file src/my-program-src.cpp, line 57

Run the program:

(gdb) run 
 Starting program: /home/me/build-path/my-program

The program stops at the breakpoint, as expected:

 Breakpoint 1 MyClass:func(this-0xffffc1c0) at src/my-program-src.cpp:235

Line 235 of my-program-src.cpp is a constructor call for class Derived which is in MySharedLib1.so.

'class Derived' is derived from 'class Base' which is in MySharedLib2.so

If I now step, the program exits inside `MySharedLib2.so' with a SIG SEGV (which is what I am trying to debug), i.e:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0024c2fa in osal::MsgQMsg::id(unsigned int) () from /home/me/build-path/lib/libMySharedLib2.so

GDB is not stepping into either of the shared libraries.

bt gives the name of the function where the problem occurred, but list shows code in my-program-src.cpp

All code is compiled with the following options:

gcc -MD -D__LINUX__  -g -Wall -Wextra -Iinc -m32 -fpic -I../../public_inc /home/me/src/file.c -o /home/me/build-path/obj/file.o

The shared libraries are linked with the following options:

gcc -o /home/me/build-path/lib/libMySharedLib1.so -shared /home/me/build-path/obj/file.o -L/home/me/build-path/lib/ -m32

If I change the Makefiles so that archives libraries are build (i.e. .a) I can step into functions as expected.

Further information:

If I manually try to add the symbols from the shared library I get the following:

(gdb) add-symbol-file  /home/me/build-path/lib/libMySharedLib2.so
The address where /home/me/build-path/lib/libMySharedLib2.so has been loaded is missing

(Note: i get the same response from add-symbol-file once the breakpoint has been hit)

If I can set a breakpoint in a function within the shared library, GDB breaks as expected but if I type list GDB shows the calling line in the main application code (i.e. the calling function that is not in a shared library). GDB does not complain about source files not being found.

Why can't I step into my shared libraries?

Why can't I step through code in shared libraries?

share|improve this question
    
GDB doesn't step inside the constructor. Have you tried stepping into any other function in the shared library? Also have you compiled shared-library with -g option? – Manoj R Dec 18 '12 at 10:48
    
All code is compiled with the '-g' option and no optimization. GDB does not step into any function within the shared library. It will stop on a breakpoint set in the shared library but I cannot list the source line and I cannot view any variables local to the class / function where GDB has stopped. – mark Dec 18 '12 at 10:57
2  
This could be a 32/64 bit issue. You are debugging a 32-bit program with a 64-bit build of GDB. GDB is not the most stable software in the world, there are bugs. Try using a 32-bit build of GDB. – n.m. Dec 18 '12 at 13:37

It may be a typo, but you used libMySharedLib2.so with a 2 not a 1 when you tried to load the symbols.

In any case, you should use g++ to compile and link c++ code. Furthermore, the main program doesn't have to be pic, although it probably doesn't hurt.

It works for me as follows:

$ cat >lib.h
class Base
{
        int _x;
    public:
        Base(int);
};

class Derived : public Base
{
    public:
        Derived(int x);
};
$ cat >lib.cpp
#include "lib.h"

Base::Base(int x)
{
    _x = *reinterpret_cast<int*>(x);
}

Derived::Derived(int x) : Base(x)
{
}
$ cat >main.cpp
#include "lib.h"

int main(int, char**)
{
    Derived d(0);
    return 0;
}
$ g++ -shared -fpic -m32 -g -Wall -o libMySharedLib1.so lib.cpp
$ g++ -m32 -g -Wall -L. -l MySharedLib1 main.cpp
$ LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$PWD gdb ./a.out
GNU gdb (GDB) 7.3.50.20111117-cvs-debian
Copyright (C) 2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-linux-gnu".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/bugs/>...
Reading symbols from a.out...done.
(gdb) r
Starting program: a.out     

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0xf7fdb552 in Base::Base (this=0xffffd83c, x=0) at lib.cpp:5
5           _x = *reinterpret_cast<int*>(x);
(gdb) bt
#0  0xf7fdb552 in Base::Base (this=0xffffd83c, x=0) at lib.cpp:5
#1  0xf7fdb5ba in Derived::Derived (this=0xffffd83c, x=0) at lib.cpp:8
#2  0x08048591 in main () at main.cpp:5
(gdb) br main
Breakpoint 1 at 0x804857d: file main.cpp, line 5.
(gdb) r
The program being debugged has been started already.
Start it from the beginning? (y or n) y
Starting program: a.out     

Breakpoint 1, main () at main.cpp:5
5           Derived d(0);
(gdb) s
Derived::Derived (this=0xffffd83c, x=0) at lib.cpp:8
8       Derived::Derived(int x) : Base(x)
(gdb) s
Base::Base (this=0xffffd83c, x=0) at lib.cpp:5
5           _x = *reinterpret_cast<int*>(x);

(gdb output slightly edited)

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