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How can I iterate over integer[] if I have:
operators_ids = string_to_array(operators_ids_g,',')::integer[];
I want iterate over operators_ids.
I can't do it in this way:
FOR oid IN operators_ids LOOP
and this:
FOR oid IN SELECT operators_ids LOOP
oid is integer;

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2 Answers 2

You can iterate over an array like

DO
$body$
DECLARE your_array integer[] := '{1, 2, 3}'::integer[];
BEGIN
    FOR i IN array_lower(your_array, 1) .. array_upper(your_array, 1)
    LOOP

    -- do something with your value
    raise notice '%', your_array[i];

    END LOOP;
END;
$body$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;

But the main question in my view is: why do you need to do this? There are chances you can solve your problem in better ways, for example:

DO
$body$
DECLARE i record;
BEGIN
    FOR i IN (SELECT operators_id FROM your_table)
    LOOP

    -- do something with your value
    raise notice '%', i.operators_id;

    END LOOP;
END;
$body$
LANGUAGE plpgsql;
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because operators_ids is a field which I want to use in select statement in loop: FOR oid IN SELECT operators_ids LOOP RETURN QUERY SELECT * FROM "PRD".events_log WHERE (event_type_id = 100 OR event_type_id = 101) AND person_id = oid AND plc_time < begin_date_g ORDER BY plc_time DESC LIMIT 1; END LOOP; –  user1756277 Dec 18 '12 at 12:13
    
But I provide operators_id from function argument as text (integers separeted by comma) –  user1756277 Dec 18 '12 at 12:25
    
Then you should redesign your schema or the ways you access your data. –  dezso Dec 18 '12 at 12:28

I think Dezso is right. You do not need to use looping the array using an index. If you make a select statement grouping by person_id in combination with limit 1, you have the result set you wanted:

create or replace function statement_example(p_data text[]) returns int as $$
declare
 rw event_log%rowtype;
begin
  for rw in select * from "PRD".events_log where (event_type_id = 100 or event_type_id = 101) and person_id = any(operators_id::int[]) and plc_time < begin_date_g order by plc_time desc group by person_id limit 1 loop
  raise notice 'interesting log: %', rw.field;
  end loop;
  return 1;
end;
$$ language plpgsql volatile;

That should perform much better. If you still prefer looping an integer array and there are a lot of person_ids to look after, then might you consider using the flyweight design pattern:

create or replace function flyweight_example(p_data text[]) returns int as $$
declare
 i_id int;
 i_min int;
 i_max int;
begin
 i_min := array_lower(p_data,1);
 i_max := array_upper(p_data,1);
 for i_id in i_min .. i_max loop
  raise notice 'interesting log: %',p_data[i_id];
 end loop;
 return 1;
end;
$$ language plpgsql volatile;
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