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I have two data structures:

typedef struct{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
}EVENTS;

EVENTS typeone[20];
EVENTS typetwo[20];

These have been filled. typeone has been filled till typeone[5] and typetwo till typetwo[8].

I just want to compare the first six of typeone and typetwo and see if there are equal in all their members.

Is there a way to do typeone[1] == typetwo[1] Basically comparing all the values inside the datastructure at [1]. Is there a short way to do this or would I have to loop through each member and compare separately?

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
 typedef struct{
     int a;
     int b;
     int c;
 }EVENTS;

 #pragma pack(1)
     EVENTS typeone[20];
     EVENTS typetwo[20];
 #pragma pack()

 int equal(EVENTS* v1, EVENTS* v2)
 {
      return 0==memcmp(v1, v2, sizeof(*v1));
 }

Note #pragma pack(1). It ensures that there are no padding bytes in the structures. This way memcmp will not try to compare padding bytes and the comparison is way faster than a field-by-field method, but while in this case the performance is unlikely to be adversely affected, take:

     typedef struct{
         char a;
         long b;
     } somestruct;

 #pragma pack(1)
     somestruct foo;
 #pragma pack()

Retrieving foo.b will take much more machine code than in case of padded structures, because it will miss word-aligned position where it can be retrieved with a single 32-bit instruction, it will have to be picked out with four byte-reads, and then assembled into the target register from these four pieces. So, take the performance impact into account.

Also, check if your compiler supports #pragma pack. Most modern compilers do, but exceptions may still happen.

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This is a comp.lang.c FAQ. In a nutshell, no, C does not support struct comparison with the == operator (the answer in the FAQ states a few reasons as to why this is hard in the general case). You have to write your own function and compare member by member. As was pointed out, memcmp() is not a guaranteed way due to unspecified behavior when accessing padding bytes.

int eventsequal (const EVENTS *const a, const EVENTS *const b)
{
    if (a->a != b->a) return 0;
    if (a->b != b->b) return 0;
    if (a->c != b->c) return 0;
    return 1;
}

And then your example typeone[1] == typetwo[1] becomes

if (eventsequal (typeone + 1, typetwo + 1)) {
   /* They're equal. */
}
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1  
Methinks the correct term is "unspecified values" for the padding, not "undefined behaviour". –  Daniel Fischer Dec 18 '12 at 12:37
    
Thanks, what I meant to write, but didn't, was "due to undefined behavior when accessing padding bytes." I have corrected the text. –  Jens Dec 18 '12 at 12:44
    
Hmm, accessing padding bytes shouldn't be undefined behaviour, that would contradict "The value may be copied into an object of type unsigned char [n] (e.g., by memcpy); the resulting set of bytes is called the object representation of the value.", wouldn't it? And no, I meant "When a value is stored in an object of structure or union type, including in a member object, the bytes of the object representation that correspond to any padding bytes take unspecified values." –  Daniel Fischer Dec 18 '12 at 12:55
    
@DanielFischer This refers to the state after copying to an unsigned char array. Padding bytes in a struct are indeterminate (C99 Footnote 262). But I realize that accessing those is merely unspecified behavior (C99 J.1). I have edited the text yet again. You take the credit for being insistent! –  Jens Dec 18 '12 at 13:10
    
Aha. 6.2.6.1 speaks of "unspecified values" of the padding bytes. Footnote 262 (310 in n1570) says "The contents ... are indeterminate". Now, an indeterminate value is either an unspecified value or a trap representation (3.19.2). "The memcmp function compares the first n characters", there are no trap representations for char, so in this context, both terms coincide. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 18 '12 at 13:24
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To avoid the problem of padding, you have to compare the fields individually. This doesn't have to be all that horrible:

#include <stdbool.h>

bool EVENTS_equal(const EVENTS *e1, const EVENTS *e2)
{
  return e1->a == e2->a && e1->b == e2->b && e1->c == e2->c;
}

then just loop:

size_t i;
bool   equal = true;

for(i = 0; i < 6; ++i)
{
  if(!EVENTS_equal(typeone + i, typetwo + i))
  {
    equal = 0;
    break;
  }
}

it's not that much code really, and of course you could trivially encapsulate the looping in a function that cross-compares the n first slots of two EVENTS arrays.

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