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I've got a standard WPF MainWindow class, and what I'd like is to show a message box using System.Windows.MessageBox, get a response from the user and then run a long running operation (simulated below by a call to Sleep(...)). I'd like to set the cursor to Cursors.Wait before the operation, and back to normal at the end. Here's what I've got:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ui_button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (MessageBox.Show("Do you want to change the background?", "Change background", MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult.No)
        {
            return;
        }

        Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, new Action(() =>
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1500);

                if (Background != Brushes.Green)
                {
                    Background = Brushes.Green;
                }
                else
                {
                    Background = Brushes.White;
                }
                Cursor = Cursors.Arrow;
            }));
    }
}

This doesn't work: the cursor never appears as the wait cursor. However, if I comment out the MessageBox lines, it does work. What's going on here, and how can I get it to work as intended?

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2  
Try Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait; –  Florian Gl Dec 18 '12 at 13:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following code works for me: instead of

Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

try this:

Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
Mouse.UpdateCursor();

You turn off the wait cursor the opposite way:

Mouse.OverrideCursor = null;
Mouse.UpdateCursor();
share|improve this answer
    
This works for me for the question I asked, thanks. The code above is a simplified version of production code that uses bindings to set the Cursor with though, so I'll have to see if I can get this solution to work with my actual code. –  markmuetz Dec 18 '12 at 13:12
    
I didn't know about Mouse.OverrideCursor. As it so happens, it's exactly what I was looking for. It works better than my current solution and I'll be swapping things over to use this now. –  markmuetz Dec 18 '12 at 13:38
1  
I would also go for a background thread, though. Long running operations on the UI thread make your application unresponsive while they execute. –  metalheart Dec 18 '12 at 14:00
    
point is well taken, normally I'd use a background worker for something like this. However, this is a long running change to the GUI so must be on the GUI thread (or it would be a lot of work to separate it out), so for the time being at least I'm going to let the GUI hang. –  markmuetz Dec 18 '12 at 14:29

You run background change in the same UI thread as cursor change. Sure it`s busy with Sleep so it doesn`t show cursor change. Just make example as it should be (with several threads) and everything will be fine!

 private void ui_button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  {
     if (MessageBox.Show("Do you want to change the background?", "Change background", MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult.No)
     {
        return;
     }

     Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

     BackgroundWorker bw = new BackgroundWorker();
     bw.DoWork += BwOnDoWork;
     bw.RunWorkerCompleted += BwOnRunWorkerCompleted;
     bw.RunWorkerAsync();
  }

  private void BwOnRunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs runWorkerCompletedEventArgs)
  {
     if (Background != Brushes.Green)
     {
        Background = Brushes.Green;
     }
     else
     {
        Background = Brushes.White;
     }
     Cursor = Cursors.Arrow;
  }

  private void BwOnDoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs doWorkEventArgs)
  {
     System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1500);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
This works as well. Not sure about your explanation though, in the original question, should the change to the cursor not happen before the sleep kicks in? And why does it work if you comment out the MessageBox lines? I might end up going with this answer though. –  markmuetz Dec 18 '12 at 13:26
1  
Theoretically, UI thread is busy with Sleep so it doesnt update the UI and cursor too. Im not sure why it has time to update it without MessageBox though. I`d like to know the answer as well. –  icebat Dec 18 '12 at 13:45

try

DialogResult dialogResult = MessageBox.Show("Do you want to change the background?", "Change background", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo);
if (dialogResult == DialogResult.No)
{
    return;
}

instead of

if (MessageBox.Show("Do you want to change the background?", "Change background", MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult.No)
share|improve this answer
1  
That shouldn't really make any difference? –  Svish Dec 18 '12 at 12:54
    
@Svish: You're right, it makes no difference. I was prepared to be astounded though. Also, it should be a MessageBoxResult instead of a DialogResult. –  markmuetz Dec 18 '12 at 12:55
    
Thats how I used to get the dialog result.. I thought something with your if-statement might be wrong causing the function to return in each case. But I'm also pretty beginner in C#. I hope anyone can help you fix your problem –  Tom Kossmann Dec 18 '12 at 12:57

Try putting your code that you want to run in other thread

     ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
     {
       //your code here...
     });
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