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I want is to dump three MSSQL Server tables using a batch job. I searched around and found bcp is highly recommended for this kind of work. Looking at the documentation, it seemed what I wanted was to dump the entire table, because I wanted all the data, not a subset.

I am using the following command to extract data from the first table.

bcp glmaster out d:\ftp_root\data_xfer\glmaster.txt -n -d mu_live -t"," -S munis -U <user> -P <pwd>

with various combinations of -n or -n and -C, and spurious, unprintable characters appear in the .csv file, like a y with an umlaut or an upside down, mirror reversed "L". There is also actual data along with these characters, which appear to be at the end of each column.

What is the best way to extract clean .csv data from a SQL Server table, so it can be run from a batch job?

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You could use Powershell, see this for example: billfellows.blogspot.com/2011/03/… –  sventevit Dec 18 '12 at 15:16
    
This is a wonderful example, but I want to do this as simply as possible. If I have to learn PowerShell, I will, but would prefer to use other utilities. –  octopusgrabbus Dec 18 '12 at 15:30
    
The data may already be clean: the native format you get with -n is a binary format intended for bcp.exe only so it's not surprising that some characters are unreadable. Have you tried to re-import it? If you want a script to use with other tools then per the documentation, character format would be a better choice, i.e. -c if you have no Unicode data, or -w if you do. –  Pondlife Dec 18 '12 at 16:40
    
Please answer with your comment. That did it. –  octopusgrabbus Dec 18 '12 at 16:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The data may already be clean: the native format you get with -n is a binary format intended for bcp.exe only so it's not surprising that some characters are unreadable.

If you want a script to use with other tools then per the documentation, character format would be a better choice, i.e. -c if you have no Unicode data, or -w if you do.

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Thank you for answering this. In addition, tou might want to edit this answer to add some more information (for other viewers). That information would something else I found out. If you specify -c (worked wonderfully btw), also specifying -t results in variable length data. Once I accepted the fact that -c gave me tab-delimited and stopped using -t",", I was able to use sed to substitute \t for |. –  octopusgrabbus Dec 18 '12 at 21:01
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@octopusgrabbus Well since you've added this comment, the information is here already :) And I've edited the question title to reflect your problem description more accurately. –  Pondlife Dec 18 '12 at 21:09
    
Sounds good. I appreciate the answer, because it was like dawn breaking on Marblehead. –  octopusgrabbus Dec 18 '12 at 21:15

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