Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently started using boost mirror for ORM reflection so I can minimize the amount of DB-related boiler-plate code.

One kind of pattern I've run into is listed below.

Since Bar's code is going to look identical even for Baz, I was wondering, is it possible to collapse this code any further?

It would be nice if the getValues() interface would look the same, but the identical implementation could also live in Foo instead.

#include <iostream>

template< typename T >
struct Foo
{
    static std::ostream& GetValues_Worker( std::ostream& os, T const& t )
    {
        // do boost mirror reflection stuff here
        return os;
    }
};

struct Bar : 
    public Foo<Bar>
{
    // REFACTOR IF POSSIBLE:  this code will always look the same - even for Baz
    std::ostream& 
    getValues( std::ostream& os ) const
    {
        return GetValues_Worker( os, *this );
    }
};

struct Baz : 
    public Foo<Baz>
{
    // REFACTOR IF POSSIBLE:  looks the same as Bar
    std::ostream& 
    getValues( std::ostream& os ) const
    {
        return GetValues_Worker( os, *this );
    }
};

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    Bar b;
    std::cerr << b.getValues( std::cerr ) << std::endl;
}

ANSWER

It turns out that ecatmur's answer below works in most cases. In my specific situation, I adapted his solution to my real code, it worked in 2 out of 4 cases. In the two cases where it failed to work, it was a bit beyond the scope of the Mickey-Mouse example that I gave above. The closest explanation that I could find in SO which explains the compile-time errors I was getting is probably this post. The crux of the problem appeared to be related to what was happening inside my Worker code. In the two failed cases, I was doing output streaming of the subclasses' members based on what I was getting back from runtime reflection results in boost mirror. I think this is turned out to be a case of non-deducible context. I still don't understand why the solution in those two failed cases works exactly (why using a visitor in the form of a virtual method gets around the issue). Anyhow, I stumbled upon that approach and was trying to reduce the code some more (in those 4 cases), but in two of them, I couldn't really reduce that code any more without running into the non-deducible context issue.

share|improve this question
    
Who or what is Baz? –  Kerrek SB Dec 18 '12 at 13:42
1  
Where is Baz? –  Pubby Dec 18 '12 at 13:42
    
I didn't put a Baz because it would look the same as Bar - I'll add... –  kfmfe04 Dec 18 '12 at 13:43
2  
If you have two classes that looks and behaves the same, why have two classes? If they are mostly the same, then you could have a common base class. As you already have a common base class, why not simple make the common functions virtual members of the base class? –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 18 '12 at 13:44
1  
struct Baz : public Foo<Bar>; should it be Foo<Baz>? –  iammilind Dec 18 '12 at 13:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Bar::getValues can be moved to Foo<Bar> using a CRTP downcast:

template< typename T >
struct Foo
{
    static std::ostream& GetValues_Worker( std::ostream& os, T const& t )
    {
        // do boost mirror reflection stuff here
        return os;
    }

    std::ostream& getValues( std::ostream& os ) const
    {
        return GetValues_Worker( os, *static_cast<T const *>(this) );
    }
};

At this point you might as well combine the two methods:

template< typename T >
struct Foo
{
    std::ostream& getValues( std::ostream& os ) const
    {
        T const &t = *static_cast<T const *>(this);
        // do boost mirror reflection stuff here
        return os;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
+1 YES! I think this is what I need - tyvm for the simplified code –  kfmfe04 Dec 18 '12 at 13:46
    
Maybe T const *? –  Kerrek SB Dec 18 '12 at 13:57
    
@KerrekSB oops yes, thanks. –  ecatmur Dec 18 '12 at 14:00
    
One quick addendum - if that function happened to be operator==( T const&) instead, would I be forced to leave it in Bar and Baz and use the two tier call? –  kfmfe04 Dec 18 '12 at 14:09
    
@kfmfe04 not at all; Foo<T> can write bool operator==(T const &) const and the correct operator will be picked up by Bar and Baz. –  ecatmur Dec 18 '12 at 14:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.