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I have a Windows application that I want to introduce TPL functionality to. The scenario is that I have a class with a Process method that has a collection of MailMessages passed to it, as well as the current IMAP connection (using AE.Net.Mail).

I want to spin off as many threads as possible to an Execute method in another class that takes a single MailMessage item, and the MailMessage to the DB, and then uses the IMAP connection to delete the MailMessage from the server.

I'm not worried too much about keeping track of the processes - I'm dealing with large numbers of emails, and not worried if I get some errors in writing to the DB or deleting. I just need the application to get through a large number of MailMessages as quick as possible.

I have been playing around with Task<MailMessage>.Factory.StartNew but I dont really know what I am doing. I don't seem to be able to kick it off...here's what I have tried:

Task test = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
  foreach (var mailMessage in _mms)
  {
    new ProcessMessage().Execute(mailMessage, imapConn);
  }

});

I'm pretty sure I should not have a loop in the lamda expression, when I run this it does not seem to go into ProcessMessage.Execute.

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5 Answers 5

You definitely shouldn't have a loop in your lamdba expression. Try this:

_mms.ForEach(mms => {
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => ProcessMessage().Execute(mailMessage, imapConn))
});

If you're not worried about keeping track of results or anything you don't need to save an instance of a Task such as Task test = .... you can just kickstart the method execution in a new thread using Task.Factory.StartNew() This way we can simply start up a new Task for each mail message you want to process and let the thread pool take care of things for us.

Also, Task<MailMessage>.Factory.StartNew would be used to set up a method call in another thread that returns a MailMessage so if you are calling a void method you don't need to do this. The Task<object> syntax always refers to the return type of the method you are starting up with a new Task.

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1  
@JasonHiggins He suggested an approach that can be easily made more readable and efficient (by using Parallel.ForEach()). And he used a method (ForEach() instead of foreach) that's sometimes frowned upon. So, I wouldn't go that far as saying he is the next Jon Skeet :-) –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 15:56
1  
The OP had specific questions regarding the TPL which is why I decided to use this approach in my answer. Also, in regards to foreach vs ForEach it is my understanding that the ForEach extension method is frowned upon in cases where there are potential unwanted side effects and I don't think that executing a void method using the TPL would be a bad case to use this version. If you are more comfortable with the foreach loop its certainly easy to translate this code to use that. That being said, I certainly wouldn't compare myself to Jon Skeet :) –  Jesse Carter Dec 18 '12 at 16:09

Right now you are executing your foreach loop as a separate task, but you probably want to execute each iteration as a separate task. You should try the Parallel.ForEach:

        Parallel.ForEach(_mms, mailMessage =>
            {
                new ProcessMessage().Execute(mailMessage, imapConn);
            });

This will execute iterations in parallel, which seems to be what you are trying to do.

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There are some inaccuracies in your answer. Parallel.ForEach() doesn't execute each iteration as a separate Task, because using one Task for more iterations has smaller overhead. And if by “execute all iterations in parallel” you mean “execute all iterations at once”, then that's wrong too. –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 15:51
    
@svick I don't recall claiming that Parallel.Foreach() executes each iteration in a separate Task... And I probably should remove the word 'all' to be more exact. –  Edwin de Koning Dec 18 '12 at 16:06
    
The way you wrote your answer implies that: “you probably want to execute each iteration as a separate task. You should try the Parallel.ForEach [to do that]” –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 16:07
    
It will not execute /all/ iterations in parallel, it will execute them in batches which is determined by the hardware and tpl library. –  AdamV Dec 18 '12 at 23:12
    
By popular demand I removed the word 'all'. –  Edwin de Koning Dec 19 '12 at 8:46

Another option is to use .AsParallel() and .ForAll() on the collection:

_mms.AsParallel()
    .ForAll(mm => ProcessMessage().Execute(mm, imapConn));
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That should do each execution in separate thread (so you know what you are doing now :) )

  foreach (var mailMessage in _mms)
  {
     ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
     {
        new ProcessMessage().Execute(mailMessage, imapConn);
     });
  }

or

  foreach (var mailMessage in _mms)
  {
      new Thread(delegate() { new ProcessMessage().Execute(mailMessage, imapConn); }).Start();
  }
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3  
Why would you suggest using ThreadPool or Thread when you can use Tasks? And creating a large number of Threads is a bad idea. –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 15:45
    
@svick can you and guys like you stop saying it's a bad idea and tell the reason for why it's a bad idea? And why you suggest using Tasks if there are threads? Do you really think that creating 1000 Tasks is better than create 1000 queued Threads? –  Vlad L Dec 18 '12 at 16:01
3  
Absolutely, 1000 Tasks is much better than 1000 Threads (there is nothing queued about them). Each Thread consumes 1 MB of memory (and some other resources), whereas 1000 Tasks will use the ThreadPool to execute with much smaller memory footprint. So, your approach will waste resources in a big way and can also easily cause OutOfMemoryException, if you're running in a 32-bit process. –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 16:04
1  
There is a huge difference between using ThreadPool and creating new Threads. What I'm saying is that your second snippet is terrible waste of resources, because it doesn't use ThreadPool. Your first snippet is much better, but using Tasks would be better still, because it has better API, and also some performance improvements. –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 17:14
1  
And if you call using ThreadPool directly “creating queued Threads”, then I think it's you who has no idea what a Thread is, because saying that is very misleading. But I admit I don't know what “tcb” means, could you enlighten me about that? –  svick Dec 18 '12 at 17:15

when I run this it does not seem to go into ProcessMessage.Execute.

Then there must be something else wrong with your code, your code certainly should work. And having a loop in the lambda might be entirely appropriate if you don't want to (or can't) parallelize your code.

If you do want to parallelize it (which is not that clear from your question), you could use for example Parallel.ForEach() which is optimized exactly for this.

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