Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the code below, I used closure to "save" the "this" reference and pass it to a callback. But i was wondering, are there alternative techniques to accomplish the same thing?

function App()
{   
    this.number = 75;
}

App.prototype.xmlHandler = function(self)
{
    if (this.number == 99) //true at run-time
        console.log("this.number == 99 is true");
    else
        console.log("this.number == 99 is false");

    if (self.number == app.number) //true at run-time
        console.log("self.number == app.number is true");
    else
        console.log("self.number == app.number is false");
};

App.prototype.loadXML = function(url, handler)
{
    var self = this;
    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.number = 99;
    req.addEventListener("load", function(){handler.call(req, self);}, false);
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.send();
};

App.prototype.init = function()
{
    this.loadXML('resources.xml', this.xmlHandler);
};

var app = new App();
app.init();

Under the xmlHandler method, there are essentially two different "this" (one [this] for the req object and the other [self] for the app object). so, are there alternative techniques to get two different "this" values under one roof?

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't var self = this just do the trick of, saving the current context, fine, Why would you need an other way of doing this? –  C5H8NNaO4 Dec 18 '12 at 14:03
    
You can save the reference as a property in another object accessible in that context, e.g. in this case the event.target. But again, why the solution above is not good? –  Adrian Ber Dec 18 '12 at 14:06
    
I'm curious if there exist alternative techniques to closures. Or, are closure the only thing available? –  user1906062 Dec 18 '12 at 14:07
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are utility functions that can create a closure, but without the verbosity.

In this particular case you can use the ES5 Function.bind method (shims are readily available for older browsers):

App.prototype.loadXML = function(url, handler) {
    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.number = 99;
    req.addEventListener("load", handler.bind(this, req), false);
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.send();
};

The result will be that handler (which is equal to this.xmlHandler) will be called with this still equal to its original value (i.e. the App object) and with req as the first parameter.

Strictly speaking this is the opposite way around to your current definition of xmlHandler, but it's more logical IMHO to have this refer to the App object instead of it being passed as a parameter. That function would then be written:

App.prototype.xmlHandler = function(req, evt) {
    if (req.number == ...) {
        ...
    }
    ...
}

Note how the evt parameter is also available - the parameter(s) passed in .bind are prepended to any parameters that are supplied by the browser.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In general, there are no alternatives to closures.

For the this binding, you can use the .bind() Function method (native with ES5.1, easily shimable) if you need only one of them. For "two different 'this' values" you could need to write a similiar function that passes the second context as a parameter, but the closure is simpler then imho.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Practically speaking, the only way you can get this to work is by using closures.

That said, looking at your code, I don't think .loadXML() should really care about context at all:

App.prototype.loadXML = function(url, handler)
{
    var req = new XMLHttpRequest();
    req.number = 99;
    req.addEventListener("load", handler, false);
    req.open('GET', url, true);
    req.send();
};

This cleans up the function, so that what you really want to do can be expressed inside the .init():

App.prototype.init = function()
{
    var self = this;

    this.loadXML('resources.xml', function(evt) {
        // this refers to the XMLHttpRequest
        // self refers to the current App instance
        self.xmlHandler(this);
    });
};
share|improve this answer
    
or even this.loadXML(..., this.xmlHandler.bind(this)); –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 14:23
    
@Alnitak Oh, that's nifty :) –  Jack Dec 18 '12 at 14:25
    
@Alnitak But the problem is that you would lose the XMLHttpRequest reference in the process :) –  Jack Dec 18 '12 at 14:33
    
ah - you mean within .loadXML? - hat's a problem because the XMLHttpRequest is lexically scoped so the only way to pass it to the handler is as this or through a closure. The .bind call emulates the second block of code, but doesn't resolve the problem your first code block has in passing req to handler. –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 14:38
    
ah - what you would do change .loadXML to say req.addEventListener("load", handler.bind(this, req), false). It's still creating a closure, but it's less verbose. You would then pass this.xmlHandler directly in the this.loadXML call. –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 14:49
show 2 more comments

Exactly what are you trying to achieve? What do the "true at run time" comments refer to?

You are mixing two things up here: closures are great an powerful in JavaScript in that a closure can be grabbed out of the context it was declared in and will still "see" the variables that were available in its scope at the time of declaration. When you, for e.g., pass in an anonymous closure object to a function as parameter, it will still have access to all variables that are accessible to it in the declaration's context.

The other thing is calling function's in an alternate context. You already do this in your code and I think you do it the right way. Your particular situation, to have 2 "this" references at any one time is, of course, not possible. Using call() and apply() in JS, you can replace the this reference in any function.

Again, I'm not getting what you're trying to do here. Probably you don't need either closures nor alternate "this" reference.

Instead of the line

req.addEventListener("load", function(){handler.call(req, self);}, false);

you could do

req.addEventListener("load", function(){handler(req);}, false);

This way in XmlHandler "this" will be a refernece to the App instance and the "req" is a parameter passed in at call time. You have both objects you need...

share|improve this answer
    
In your answer you've correctly passed req but you haven't passed this, so handler will have the global object (or null) for its context. –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 15:00
    
Because handler is a prototype member of App, it will have this pointing the App instance, I believe. –  Marcell Fülöp Dec 18 '12 at 15:04
    
no, it won't. That's only true if you call using someinstance.method(). If you alias someinstance.method to myalias and then just call myalias() then it will no longer be linked to someinstance and this will be the global object (or null in ES5 strict mode). –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 15:07
    
You may be right. But this code isn't ideal. in init() there's no need to pass in this.xmlHandler and in loadXml() handler can be referenced via this.xmlHandler. In that case the object context is preserved and when you call this.xmlHandler(), this will point to App instance inside xmlHandler. –  Marcell Fülöp Dec 18 '12 at 15:11
    
I am right. But I agree that it would make more sense for the loadXML function to specify the callback handler and not init. However passing this.xmlHandler is not sufficient to fix this - it creates the same aliasing problem I described above. Context is only preserved by calling with context.method(...) or method.apply(context, [...]) or method.call(context, ...) –  Alnitak Dec 18 '12 at 15:22
show 2 more comments

This is probably not what you're looking for. In any case this is sharing 'this'. The object 'inner' isn't retaining its objectness because it's become a method of 'outer', but it's sharing.

Let me know if you are looking for something more specific than what I've written here.

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<p id="result1"></p>
<p id="result2"></p>
</body>
<script>

var outer = function(val, obj){

    this['inner'] = obj['inner'];
            this.val = val;
    this.inner('result1')
    this.val2 = 'not 2';
    this.inner('result2');
};
var inner = function(id){
    this.val2 = this.val2 || 2;
    document.getElementById(id).innerHTML = 'this.val='+this.val+'this.val2='+this.val2;

};

new outer('thing', {'inner': inner});
</script>
</html>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.