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I have a number of classes that all override their equals and hashCode methods to look like this:

final class MyClass {
  public void statelessMethod() {
    // ...
  }

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    return obj instanceof MyClass;
  }

  @Override
  public int hashCode() {
    return MyClass.class.hashCode();
  }
}

The idea being that while the class has no state that ever changes new MyClass().equals(new MyClass()) should always be true.

What I'm looking for is some code pattern or utility class that I can write (or reuse) that will remove as much of the boilerplate as I can.

Background

I'm using this pattern for defining Guice modules so that if more than one module depends on UtilModule (for example) I don't end up getting errors caused by multiple bindings of the same type.

Extra Background

This pattern was duplicated from the Guice Servlets InternalServletModule which uses it to allow you to specify multiple ServletModule modules in your injector configuration without duplicating the bindings that are provided as part of that class.

Example of real use to answer some of the comments

final class UtilModule extends AbstractModule {
  public void configure() {
    // bindings and things
  }

  @Override
  public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    return obj instanceof UtilModule;
  }

  @Override
  public int hashCode() {
    return UtilModule.class.hashCode();
  }
}

Example of more than one module depending on UtilModule (from comments)

class Module1 extends AbstractModule {
  @Override
  protected void configure() {
    bind(SomeClass.class).to(SomeClassImpl.class);
    install(new UtilModule()); // needed by SomeClassImpl
  }
}

class Module2 extends AbstractModule {
  @Override
  protected void configure() {
    bind(MyService.class).in(Singleton.class);
    install(new UtilModule()); // needed by MyService
  }
}

class Main {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(
        new Module1(),
        new Module2());
    // ...
  }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Do you even need to be able to create instances of this class? Why not make the constructor private and all methods static? –  NPE Dec 18 '12 at 14:25
1  
You could do it in a parent type (and make the methods final) but this all smells a hack. –  McDowell Dec 18 '12 at 14:27
    
You have a method that returns no value and has no state? –  Samuel Edwin Ward Dec 18 '12 at 14:28
    
I edited the question with a more complex example to clear up why static won't work –  Matt Dec 18 '12 at 14:39
1  
@Charlie - Thanks, neither of those two options seems very nice to me, option one would require a lot of modules being passed in the constructors of other modules. Option two is what I used to have before I found this patterns and you end up in a huge run-error-fix-run cycle as you try to figure out all the missing modules that you should be installing. The pattern I found with the equals works fine for me for this reuse, I would just like some help reducing the boilerplate –  Matt Dec 18 '12 at 15:29

1 Answer 1

Your classes could all extend a common base class which implements equals and hashCode. In that case you have to replace the references to MyClass with this.getClass().

Also, instanceof is not what you want, because it will also return true when obj is of a class which extends the current class. That would not just be unlikely to be what you want, it would also violate the contract of equals, because when you compare an instance of a base class with an instance of an extending class, it would matter on which one you call the equals method (derived is instanceof base, but base isn't instanceof derived).

The implementation in your base class would look like that:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
   this.getClass().equals(obj.getClass())
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
  return this.getClass().hashCode();
}

On an unrelated note: When the objects have no internal state, why not use the Singleton pattern?

share|improve this answer
    
please note my edit regarding instanceof –  Philipp Dec 18 '12 at 14:34
    
Using the singleton pattern is a possible option, it kind of goes against the patterns used for the rest of the classes I've written and could cause some confusion as to where to get a particular instance from, i.e. some classes are created via new and some via singleton patterns but both are used in the same place. –  Matt Dec 18 '12 at 14:44
    
Sub-classing could work, I would have to be careful to avoid pitfalls related to multiple inheritance though. I guess having it there for use in simple hierarchies would be useful for the simple case and you can always fall back to writing it yourself in the more complex case –  Matt Dec 18 '12 at 14:48
1  
Also, instanceof is not what you want, because it will also return true when obj is of a class which extends the current class - I think it works in this case because my class is final –  Matt Dec 18 '12 at 14:48
    
@Matt - "... I would have to be careful to avoid pitfalls related to multiple inheritance though" ... Java doesn't allow multiple inheritence. –  Stephen C Dec 18 '12 at 14:49

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