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If I have a class like this:

class Foo implements HasBarMethod {
  public double bar(double x) {
    return x*x;
  }
}

Now I have

Foo foo = new Foo();
someObjectOutputStreamToSomeFile.writeObject(foo);

which is executed. Later I decide to change Foo's definition, like so:

class Foo implements HasBarMethod {
  public double bar(double x) {
    return x+x;
  }
}

is it possible to do:

HasBarMethod foo = (HasBarMethod)someObjectInputStreamFromSameFile.readObject();

HasBarMethod didn't change. Now I want to get the square of x out of foo.bar(x), not the sum. Is this possible?

Of course, I should make different classes Foo1, Foo2, ..., with different names, as a good practice. And I will if I am making a website with different kinds of Blogs. But given that I am doing experimental stuff (lot's of numbers and lot's of ways to interpreter them), it would be great to not have to go into all the details of writing a huge class inheritance structure, given that different Foo-classes will only have small adaptions

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1  
As others said: Serialization only handles the data in instances of classes. Therefore, if you modify a class and then de-serialize a stream written before the modification you will receive an instance of the modified class; or an exception if the new class is not 'compatible' with the serialized form of the old one. - This is bad practice anyway, so you should not bother with this issue. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 15:13
    
I'm sorry for not being clear. I am ware what serialization does, and I know it doesn't store class logic ;) In my case, I work with a neural network, for which different inputs can be defined. I add features to the input, I debug, etc. But this screws thing up easily, since a trained network will be nonsense if the input provided during use or testing is different. Currently I store the java code as text. Making a new class for each change is painful, making everything parametric is also painful. Yet, thank you for taking the time to follow what I was doing :) –  Herbert Dec 18 '12 at 15:49
    
Also an important note, each run, only one class-logic instance is used :) –  Herbert Dec 18 '12 at 15:51
    
Have you considered to use a version control system like CVS or SVN to keep track of your changes to both code and data? –  Hanno Binder Dec 24 '12 at 15:54

2 Answers 2

Java serialisation saves the fields. The instructions for the methods are saved in the class file.

Perhaps look at saving different class files and different class loaders, or using a byte code library to make small changes based on an input file, though it is likely that both are significantly more complicated than just having differently named classes for different behaviours.

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You got it, I will be saving the java and calling the runtime-compiler. –  Herbert Dec 18 '12 at 15:50
1  
Then maybe have a look at the Java Scripting API. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 15:54

If I got the question right, you want to implement a class whose behavior changes dynamically, depending on the situation. You can implement one of the common patterns (sorry, don't remember its name):

//create function objects
class Sum implements HasBarMethod{
    public double bar(double x) {
        return x+x;
    }
}

class Multiply implements HasBarMethod{
    public double bar(double x) {
        return x*x;
    }
}

//create the base class
class DynamicBehavior{
    private HasBarMethod strategy;
    //other class fields

    public DynamicBehavior(HasBarMethod strategy){
        this.strategy = strategy;
        // ...
    }

    public double bar(double x) {
        return strategy.bar(x);
    }

    //you may want to handle strategy change in a different way.
    //this here is just a simple example.
    public setStrategy(HasBarMethod strategy){
        this.strategy = strategy;
    }

    //any code implementing strategy changes or whatever
}

This will allow you to change the strategies your class uses depending on its state or any other conditions you may wish to take into consideration.

An example of its usage:

public static void main(String args[]){
    HasBarMethod defaultStrategy = new Sum();
    DynamicBehavior dyn = new DynamicBehavior(defaultStrategy);


    if( /*condition*/ ){
        dyn.setStrategy(new Multiply());
    }

    double result = dyn.bar(5);
}

You might as well want to turn your strategy function objects into static fields of the base class as this will save you some memory and time by avoiding creation of their new instances each time you decide to switch strategies.

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Thank you for posting a detailed comment on how to solve this with inheritance. Yet, it's not quite what I want, since each class would have small differences, moreover there would be many classes. Many classes is bad, it makes everything cluttered. I want stuff to be clear. –  Herbert Dec 18 '12 at 15:50
    
This is not inheritance, but composition. You can implement strategy classes as nested classes or anonymous inner classes as well. I don't think there is a way you can avoid writing their code at all. –  svz Dec 18 '12 at 15:55

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