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I'm wondering as to why my private variable 'name' within my Events class won't change when I access the property from my Leisure class which inherits from Events. I need Leisure to use the properties to change it, and then in my form class, it should be able to read the value of 'name' from events. See below:

public partial class Form1 : Form //Main form class
{
    private string eventType; //used for event type selection
    private string formEventName; //used to store selected event name


     private void itemSend_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //encapsulation
        Events myEv = new Events();
        string name=itemInput.Text; 
        myEv.myEvent(eventType, name);
        formEventName = myEv.myName;
        txtOutput.Text = "Event name is " + formEventName + "\r\n";            
    }

class Events:Form1
{
    private string name; //private variable for event name      
     public string myName //used to change property value depending on what eveny type/ event name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { name = value; }   
    }
    public void myEvent(string eventType, string eventName) //variable recieved from main form class
    {
        if (eventType == "Leisure")
        {

           Leisure myLes = new Leisure(); 
           myLes.eventNames(eventName);  

        }
        else
        {
            //test for other event types
        }  
    }

    class Leisure:Events
 {
    public void eventNames(string eventName) 
    {

        //when adding new items add one with a capital and one without
        myEventNames.Add("music");
        myEventNames.Add("Music");
        if (myEventNames.Contains(eventName))
        {
            myName = eventName;
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("item not found, please try again"); //error message
        }
    }
  }
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Where comes myEventNames from? –  looper Dec 18 '12 at 15:04
    
myEventNames is a list within the class, sorry I must of forgot to copy that part of the code –  Scott Dec 18 '12 at 15:06
1  
Honestly, the design at a high level troubles me. These forms almost certainly shouldn't be inheriting from each other. You're confusing yourself because you think you're having access to the methods of all of the parents, but you're not actually interacting with your parents because those methods aren't being called on the proper instances. Inheritance isn't the proper way for these forms to communicate. –  Servy Dec 18 '12 at 15:12
    
Why are Events and Leasure types of forms? From what I can see, they shouldn't be forms at all because they're not shown and aren't interacting with UI elements beyond a messagebox. What's the true purpose of these two classes? What are they, at a high level, trying to accomplish? –  Servy Dec 18 '12 at 15:17
    
Events and Leisure are just classes. Events should be able to access information from the leisure class and then return this information into the form –  Scott Dec 18 '12 at 15:24
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4 Answers

It seems wrong that Events inherits from Form1.

When you say new Events(), you get a new object, unrelated to the existing form, and any changes you make to it have no effect on the existing form. That happens again when you say new Leisure().

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The myName property you are using changes the name private field of myLes instance and not the name private field of myEv instance created in the ItemSend_Click.

In an Object Oriented Language when you create an instance of a class, that instance has a copy of every non-static private/public variable declared in the class. So when you write

   Leisure myLes = new Leisure(); 

you are creating an instance of Leisure class, but this instance, while inherithing from Events has a different set of internal variables and not the same variables of the current Event instance (myEv).

Looking at your code I suggest to create a third class called

public class EventFactory
{
    public Event CreateEvent(string eventType, string eventName)
    {
        switch(enventType)
        {
            case "Leisure":
                 Leisure myLes = new Leisure(); 
                 myLes.eventNames(eventName);  
                 return myLes;
            // case Add other specialized events here:
            // break;
            default:
                 return null;
        }
    }
}

change your Events class removing the inheritance from Form1 (not needed as far as I can tell) and the method myEvent

now your ItemSend_Click could be written in this way

private void itemSend_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Events myEv = new EventFactory().CreateEvent(eventType, itemInput.Text);
    formEventName = myEv.myName;
    txtOutput.Text = "Event name is " + formEventName + "\r\n";            
}

this works because Leisure derives from Events and you could treat every Leisure instance as an Event instance.

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In which case, how do I create an object of the Leisure class within the current Event instance. Is there a way to do it without using the 'new' operator? –  Scott Dec 18 '12 at 15:39
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You just change myName of the myLes (Leisure) variable in your myEv field, thats why myEv.myName is still empty.

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So the problem that you're having is just a small symptom of major fundamental problems in your code that will only continue to manifest themselves as you continue.

I've re-written what you have into something that's more in line with what is more traditionally seen for what you're trying to do. It's not perfect, and I've tried to keep things fairly simple so as to not throw too much at you at once.

public partial class Form1 : Form //Main form class
{
    private TextBox itemInput;
    private TextBox txtOutput;
    private string eventType; //used for event type selection
    private string formEventName; //used to store selected event name

    private void itemSend_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        string name = itemInput.Text;
        try
        {
            Event myEvent = Event.Create(eventType, name);
            txtOutput.Text = "Event name is " + myEvent.Name + "\r\n";
        }
        catch (ArgumentException ex)//if the event name isn't valid
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
    }
}

public abstract class Event
{
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public Event(string eventName)
    {
        Name = eventName;
    }
    public static Event Create(string eventType, string eventName)
    {
        if (eventType == "Leisure")
        {

            Leisure myLes = new Leisure(eventName);
            return myLes;

        }
        //  else if { ... } test for other event types
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

public class Leisure : Event
{
    private static List<string> myEventNames =
        new List<string>() { "music", "Music" };
    public Leisure(string eventName)
        : base(eventName)
    {
        if (!myEventNames.Contains(eventName))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Not a valid Leisure event name");
        }
    }
}

So, let's go over some of the changes. First off, Event doesn't inherit from Form1. It should not do so. An event is not conceptually a type of form at all, let alone that particular type of form. An Event should have no knowledge of any form, in any way, not just inheritance. It's just some other class that Form1 will use, but it could just as easily be used by any other type of class, form or otherwise.

In addition to making Event not inherit from Form, I've made it abstract. It doesn't have any abstract methods, it's just that you shouldn't ever be creating just an plain Event, you should only ever actually create some specific type of event. Being a common base class, it's easiest to prevent accidental creation and to help improve readability by making it abstract.

I've also made Event immutable. Rather than allowing name to be changed at any time, creating an event without giving it a name, and then changing it later, I have configured it such that you need to provide the name and type before creating the event, and then there's no way of changing it once it's created. The Name is set in the constructor, and I have added a static Create method which is where the logic can go for choosing the proper subtype of Event and actually creating it. This is a simple version of the "Factory Pattern". Note that normally I wouldn't pass the type in as a string. I would make it something like an Enum, so that it's easier to tell what the valid options are.

Now onto Leisure. Logically, Leisure really is an Event and should inherit from it. Your problems were steming from the fact that you created an instance of Event, and also an instance of Leisure, and assumed that they shared the same variables. They don't, but that confusion should go away now that you can't ever have an instance of Event.

When a Leisure is created it uses the base class constructor to set Name, since it doesn't have access to set the property itself.

From what I can see myEventNames is just a list of valid names, and it doesn't appear to change between different types of Leisure instances, so it makes sense for it to be static, which means it's shared between all instances and is only created once.

I also moved the MessageBox call out of the Leisure type's constructor. Instead I'm throwing an exception. The main idea here is that you shouldn't mix your UI code with your business code. Event and Leisure are both business objects and shouldn't know anything about what, if any, UI exists. You should be able to use them from a console app, an ASP application, etc. On top of that, since what we're trying to say is that this is an invalid name and the type shouldn't exist, the end result of throwing an Excpetion in the constructor is that the object never becomes "valid". We don't allow the creation of an object that shouldn't exist, as opposed to allowing them to continue using the object anyway.

That exception is caught with the try/catch block in Form1, where it shows the appropriate MessageBox based on the failure to create the event.

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Thanks very much, that's really helped! –  Scott Dec 19 '12 at 16:40
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