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I've got two C files, server.c and client.c. The server has to create a fifo file and constantly read in it, waiting for input. The client gets its PID and writes the PID in the fifo. This is my server file which I launch first:

int main(){
  int fd;
  int fd1;
    int bytes_read;
    char * buffer = malloc(5);
    int nbytes = sizeof(buffer);

    if((fd = mkfifo("serverfifo",0666)) == -1) printf("create fifo error");
    else printf("create fifo ok");

    if ((fd1 = open("serverfifo",O_RDWR)) == -1) printf("open fifo error");
    else{
        printf("open fifo ok"); 
        while(1){
            bytes_read = read(fd,buffer,nbytes);
            printf("%d",bytes_read);
            }
        }

return(0);
}

And my client file :

int main(){

    int fd;
    int pid = 0;
    char *fifo;
    int bytes;

    if ((pid = getpid()) == 0)  printf("pid error");
    char pid_s[sizeof(pid)];
    sprintf(pid_s,"%d",pid); 


   if ((fd = open ("serverfifo",O_RDWR)) == -1)printf("open fifo error");
   else {
    printf("open fifo ok");

        bytes = write(fd,pid_s, sizeof(pid_s));
        printf("bytes = %d",bytes);

   }

    close(fd);
return(0);
}

The two main problems I'm getting are: When I write the pid to the file it returns the number of bytes I wrote so it looks okay but when I check the properties of the fifo file it says 0 bytes. The second problem is the read doesn't work. If I do a printf before it shows, but after it doesn't and the read isn't returning anything it just freezes. I realise there are a lot of similar posts on the site but I couldn't find anything that helped. I'm using Ubuntu and GCC compiler with CodeBlocks.

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1  
fifos are not regular files, it's OK if the file reports size 0. –  yiding Dec 18 '12 at 15:17
1  
I'm afraid that pretty much everything in this code is wrong somehow, and in addition your code formatting is messy and obscure. You may want to read a good book about C programming before proceeding with client/server multi-process applications. –  Lundin Dec 18 '12 at 15:34
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are many things wrong here

char pid_s[sizeof(pid)];
sprintf(pid_s,"%d",pid); 

sizeof(pid) returns the size of the pid value, not its string representation, i.e. it is sizeof(int) which is either 4 or 8, depending on your architecture. You then proceed to print it. If this works it works only by luck (you are on a 64 bit machine). The correct way to do is, if you choose to do it at all, is to allocate a suitably large buffer, and use snprintf to make sure you don't overflow. PIDs fit in 5 digits, so something like this will do:

char pid_s[8];
snprintf(pid_s, sizeof(pid_s), "%d", pid);

of course, you can skip this step all together and send the raw bytes of the pid instead

write(fd, (void*)&pid, sizeof(pid))

Now in the server you make similar mistakes:

char * buffer = malloc(5);
int nbytes = sizeof(buffer);

sizeof(buffer) returns 4 or 8 again, but you allocated 5 bytes, the correct way to do this, if you want to allocate on the heap (using malloc), is this:

char* buffer = malloc(8);
int nbytes = 8;

alternatively you can allocate on the stack:

char buffer[8];
int nbytes = sizeof(buffer);

sizeof is sort of magical, in that if you pass in an array, it returns the size of the array (8*1) in this case.

When you are reading, you read 5 bytes, which is likely not enough (because you wrote 8 bytes due to the earlier bug), so it would not finish. You should read like this

int pid;
read(fd, (void*)&pid, sizeof(pid));

Also, if you were to actually read and write strings, you'd do something like this:

// client
char pid_s[8];
snprintf(pid_s, sizeof(pid_s), "%d", pid);
write(fd, pid_s, sizeof(pid_s));

// server
char pid_s[8];
read(fd, pid_s, sizeof(pid_s));

Note also that read may return less than what was written, and you need to call it again to keep reading...

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Good analysis. The use of O_RDWR instead of O_RDONLY in the server and O_WRONLY in the client is a minor problem; it means that the opens won't block. The printf() statements are missing newlines so they don't trace the flow sanely. fd is assigned the result of mkfifo(), and then fd1 is assigned the result of open(), but the read occurs on fd (stdin if the mkfifo() succeeded, an error otherwise) instead of fd1. Rename fd1 to fd and don't save the result of mkfifo(). Close the file in the server and unlink() the FIFO before exiting. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 18 '12 at 15:57
    
Thanks for the help, i'm pretty new to low level c programming so i'm making a lot of mistakes, thanks again –  user1895293 Dec 18 '12 at 16:24
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Well there are a lot of mistake in this code... First of all sizeof is not working like that. Why do you serialize the pid ?

This is wrong :

char pid_s[sizeof(pid)];

123456 is an int and it doesn't fit into this array of size 4, only 3 char can be printed...

And because you are trying to serialize the pid you don't know the expected size to read, unless you take the worst case and write 10 + 1 for the '\0'...

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1  
While your statements are accurate and reflect very real problems the poster has, it doesn't appear that fixing these will fix the problem being reported. If this is the case, your post should have been a comment, not an answer. –  mah Dec 18 '12 at 15:29
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