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I'm looking at using the java.util.concurrent package for a simple polling class. Am a bit perplexed by range of classes, interfaces and methods available for doing this so would appreciate some guidance. Here's my thoughts so far:

The first decision to make is how to instantiate the class for managing the schedule. There seem to be a few possible options, e.g:

ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor scheduledThreadPoolExecutor =
    new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(corePoolSize)
...or...
ScheduledExecutorService scheduledExecutorService =
    Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
...or...
ScheduledExecutorService scheduledExecutorService =
    Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(corePoolSize);

Am leaning towards the last one but wondering what a sensible corePoolSize would be - perhaps 1 to keep things simple?

EDIT: In the end I found most benefit in directly instantiating ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor. ThreadPoolExecutor provides getActiveCount() for obtaining the number of active threads. This allowed me to implement a pause() method that waits until the pause has actually taken effect - see discussion.]

The next decision is whether to call scheduleAtFixedRate() or scheduleWithFixedDelay(). Am leaning towards scheduleWithFixedDelay() since the polling regularity isn't all that important and I don't like the idea of multiple polls occurring in quick succession after a bottleneck.

But here's the question: Would it be OK/advisable to use a single class that both starts the polling and represents the thread? E.g:

public class Poller extends Thread {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        ...
    }

    public void startPolling() {
        ScheduledExecutorService exec = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);
        exec.scheduleWithFixedDelay(this, 0, 5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    }
}

The main part I'm not sure about here is the first scheduleWithFixedDelay() parameter: Will a new instance of this class be instantiated for each execution? Otherwise it surely wouldn't work since run() can't be called on the same Thread instance twice?

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3  
Poller should not extend Thread but only implement Runnable! - No new instances of the passed Runnable are created. The run() method is just called multiple times. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 15:26
    
One does not submit Thread to the ExecutorService. –  Marko Topolnik Dec 18 '12 at 15:27
1  
The whole point of the Executors is to provide a pool of threads to perform tasks concurrently. If, as in your example, you only want a single thread to regularly do some polling you would usually start/manage that single thread on your own, like Thread myThread = new Thread( myPoller ); myThread.start();. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 15:30
    
These are good comments and it makes more sense already. I'm used to extending Thread rather than implementing Runnable since this is normally the recommended way. So if I use Runnable instead then it seems the same instance would get reused for each execution? Wish the Oracle documentation mentioned this! –  Steve Chambers Dec 18 '12 at 15:33
1  
Imagine if this weren't so. How would/should the ExecutorService create a new instance of your object for the next execution? - It wouldn't be able to at all. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 15:36
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As others have commented, all you need to change is Thread to Runnable. You might want to add some safe guard so that there is not multiple tasks being run.

public class Poller impliments Runnable {
    final ScheduledExecutorService exec = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
    Future future = null;

    @Override
    public void run() {
        ...
    }

    public void startPolling() {
        if (future != null && !future.isDone()) {
           future.cancel(true); // stop before restarting
           // or
           return; // already running
        }
        future = exec.scheduleWithFixedDelay(this, 0, 5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    }
}

BTW: If you have Java 5.0, the run() method does not have the @Override. For Java 6+, you should have the @Override.

Will a new instance of this class be instantiated for each execution?

A new instances is created when you use the new operator.

Otherwise it surely wouldn't work run() surely can't be called on the same Thread instance twice?

It can work because the use of Thread in your code is confusing as the thread you create is not used. It just needs to be Runnable.

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Thanks. This looks like good sensible code. Wish there was a way of sharing the answer as you and Hanno have both provided valuable input. –  Steve Chambers Dec 18 '12 at 15:57
    
In that case, I would give it to the one with the least rep. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 18 '12 at 15:57
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The single-threaded approach could use a Poller implementation like this:

public class Poller implements Runnable {
    public void run() {
        while ( mayContinue ) {
            poll();
            Thread.sleep(5000);
        }
    }
}
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Thanks again Hanno. This seems a lot simpler - had considered doing something like this but then went on StackOverflow and got steered towards java.concurrency - but maybe that's over-thinking it given it's fairly small scale. The only thing is I'm integrating with an existing product and don't know much about how it uses threads - so perhaps java.concurrency could protect against potential issues and future-proof... Am in two minds now! –  Steve Chambers Dec 18 '12 at 15:48
    
mayContinue must be volatile and Thread.sleep throws an InterruptedException which must be caught. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 18 '12 at 15:58
    
So which method would you suggest Peter? Am guessing ScheduledExecutorService must be there for a reason and protects against all the usual threading issues... –  Steve Chambers Dec 18 '12 at 16:00
1  
If I may, the ExecutorServices are there to allow efficient concurrent execution of multiple (usually short) tasks. A single Executor can for example use a single thread to process loads and loads of tasks without ever creating another thread except the first one. An Executor can also use a pool of multiple threads to process its tasks, again re-using threads instead of creating new ones over and over again. The ScheduledExecutorService is basically the same with the additional option to automatically delay or repeat the given tasks instead of processing them once and a.s.a.p.. –  Hanno Binder Dec 18 '12 at 21:33
    
Very helpful explanation - thanks again. –  Steve Chambers Dec 19 '12 at 11:30
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