Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've sifted through posts to find an answer to my question, but I've had no luck. So I thought I would create a new one and see if the community might be able to help me out! Pardon me if I don't use the correct SQL terms in describing things.

Three tables in this problem. Table A is the "main" table with no dependencies. Table B has a foreign key reference to Table A. Table C has a foreign key reference to Table B.

There are two goals for this query. First is to sum up a field, let's say fieldC, in Table C. The only condition that must be met is a field in A, let's say fieldA, must be equal to, let's say X. To be fair, this solution is simple:

SELECT Sum(C.fieldC) FROM C
  INNER JOIN B
    ON C.foreign_keyB = B.id
  INNER JOIN A
    ON B.foreign_keyA = A.id
  WHERE fieldA = X

OK, so now the second goal: I would like to count the number of rows found in Table A that match fieldA = X. I tried this:

SELECT Sum(C.fieldC), Count(A.id) FROM C
  INNER JOIN B
    ON C.foreign_keyB = B.id
  INNER JOIN A
    ON B.foreign_keyA = A.id
  WHERE fieldA = X

But I'm getting totals that are way off. Is there some glaring mistake I'm making here? Thanks for the help everyone! =)

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you using table C and B for your second query? –  Francis P Dec 18 '12 at 15:37
1  
maybe you cold give sample records with desired result. –  John Woo Dec 18 '12 at 15:37
    
when I do a count as you are I tend to need groupBy also. If you just select A.id as your only column, do you get the same value repeated in many places? You may need to group by A.id, but then that will probably throw your sum off. –  James Black Dec 18 '12 at 15:37
    
I'm sorry, I guess a third unmentioned goal is to achieve the first two goals in one query. I was just trying to be efficient. –  Bobby Knezevic Dec 18 '12 at 15:41
    
Thanks, guys. Apparently just adding the keyword distinct was the answer in my case. –  Bobby Knezevic Dec 18 '12 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

In this case, you can fix the problem using count distinct:

SELECT Sum(C.fieldC), Count(distinct A.id)
FROM C
  INNER JOIN B
    ON C.foreign_keyB = B.id
  INNER JOIN A
    ON B.foreign_keyA = A.id
  WHERE fieldA = X

If you wanted to do other operations on fields in A, such as an average value or sum, then the solution would be a bit more complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is correct, there must be a simpler answer to this problem. DISTINCT is not really fixing the problem, it's fixing the results. –  Francis P Dec 18 '12 at 15:38
    
Well that was easy. Thank you, sir! =) –  Bobby Knezevic Dec 18 '12 at 15:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.