Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm developing an iPhone application with latest SDK.

I have this code:

-(void) connectionDidFinishLoading:(NSURLConnection *) connection
{
    NSError* error = nil;
    NSObject* response =
        [NSJSONSerialization JSONObjectWithData:webData
                                        options:NSJSONReadingMutableContainers
                                          error:&error];

    if ([response isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]])
    {
        NSDictionary* resp = [response objectAtIndex:0];

This line, NSDictionary* resp = [response objectAtIndex:0]; doesn't work. I get this compilation time error: No visible @interface for 'NSObject' declares the selector 'objectAtIndex:'.

I could do something like this:

NSArray* array = [NSArray initWithArray:response]; but I think it will create two objects and it will waste resources.

How do I cast a NSObject to NSArray?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by 0x7fffffff, Tomasz Wojtkowiak, kmp, false, Alex Dec 18 '12 at 19:23

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
There is no reason why your code shouldn't work. –  Sulthan Dec 18 '12 at 15:47
    
This is the reason: No visible @interface for 'NSObject' declares the selector 'objectAtIndex:' –  VansFannel Dec 18 '12 at 15:50
    
Please, stop downvoting. It's a good question that really doesn't work. –  VansFannel Dec 18 '12 at 15:51
2  
I can't speak for the other down voters, but you earned mine when I asked what you've tried to fix the problem your self and you said "Nothing. I don't know how do to it." With over 4000 rep you should know by now that this isn't how SO works. –  0x7fffffff Dec 18 '12 at 15:53
2  
if your response can represent different classes use id as type not NSObject –  Jonathan Cichon Dec 18 '12 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This tutorial explains why I must use id response = instead of NSObject* response =.

If I use id I can send any message to response object.

So, If I have checked if [response isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]] there won't be any problem if I do [response objectAtIndex:0].

And also, it won't be any compilation time error.

I've added this answer because there will be more people with the same problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This is really the correct answer. If you don't know the type of an object, just don't give it a static type! Declaring it as an NSObject * is misleading the type checker into thinking that you mean to treat the variable as an NSObject when you actually mean to treat it as something more specific, which is why you get spurious errors. –  Chuck Dec 18 '12 at 17:56

Try this:

NSDictionary* resp = [((NSArray *)response) objectAtIndex:0];

Hope it works

share|improve this answer
    
Can someone explain me why was this answer downvoted? –  Novarg Dec 18 '12 at 16:00
1  
I'm not the one who downvoted you, but if anyone did, it's likely because your answer is like a plaster on a wound that still exists, which is response being an instance of NSObject when it should have been id instead. –  trudyscousin Dec 18 '12 at 18:16

This should work:

-(void) connectionDidFinishLoading:(NSURLConnection *) connection
{
    NSError* error = nil;
    NSObject* response =
    [NSJSONSerialization JSONObjectWithData:webData
                                    options:NSJSONReadingMutableContainers
                                      error:&error];

    if ([response isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]])
    {
        NSArray *responseArray = (NSArray*)response;
        NSDictionary* resp = [responseArray objectAtIndex:0];
share|improve this answer
2  
Casting and then checking? –  Sulthan Dec 18 '12 at 15:47
    
I have updated my answer. Although, is it by definition wrong to cast first and check after? Since it wouldn't crash or anything. Or is it just bad practice to do it this way? –  Roland Keesom Dec 18 '12 at 15:58
    
So a downvote and a comment, but no explanation why it is wrong? –  Roland Keesom Dec 18 '12 at 16:15
    
I am not the downvoter, but as trudyscousin said on the other answer that got downvoted, it's probably because this is a kludge rather than a fix for the underlying problem, which is that the variable was incorrectly typed as NSObject*. –  Chuck Dec 18 '12 at 18:35
1  
Also, if you are going to cast, it doesn't really matter at what point you do it as long as you're only sending messages both classes respond to (such as isKindOfClass:). –  Chuck Dec 18 '12 at 21:36

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.