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Does anybody experience the odd phenomenon: if an HTML form is divided into several parts by <div>'s or table <td>'s, then the <input type="submit" ... > button won't work -- nothing happens when clicking (no 'post' message is sent). If I take out all the <div>'s or table elements, the button works. Why is that? In my case, the form is inserted by Ajax. Could that be a cause of the problem? Thanks.

For example:

<div  style="float:left">
<form action="/..." class="submitForm" method="post">
...
...
</div>

<div  style="float:left">
...
...
</div>

<div>
...
<input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>
</div>

or,

<table>
<tr>
<td>
<form action="/..." class="submitForm" method="post">
...
...
</td>

<td>
...
<input ...>
...
</td

<td>
...
<input type="submit" value="submit">
</form>
</td>
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3  
Is the final HTML that is generated valid? Your first div seems problematic as it's closed inside the form but started outside the form. –  j08691 Dec 18 '12 at 15:57
    
That's exactly my question: is it not allowed to do that? If so, how do I align all the input fields? –  yltang52 Dec 18 '12 at 16:01
1  
your html MUST be a valid tree. meaning you can't have an opening tag inside another parent than its corresponding close tag. –  Kris Dec 18 '12 at 16:02
1  
If you only have one form on the page simply place the opening FORM tag tag directly after the opening BODY tag and the closing FORM tag directly before the closing BODY tag. –  Billy Moat Dec 18 '12 at 16:04
    
Got it. I moved the <form ...> and </form> out of all <div>'s or <td>'s, and it worked. Thanks, guys. –  yltang52 Dec 18 '12 at 16:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is nothing odd about it.

The HTML is invalid. The code doesn't mean anything.

Then the browser attempts to recover from your error. The results are not what you want.

If you don't write real HTML, you shouldn't expect browsers to be able to handle it.

  • Elements must describe a tree. If you open an element, you must close it before you close any of its ancestors.
  • http://validator.w3.org/ provides a useful tool for performing basic automated QA on your HTML.
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