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I have a project released under the MIT license.

I want to use inside it a part, only a small part, of a library released under the MIT license.

The text of the license is the same of my own project so I don't need to include it twice and i'm going to add a credit to the original project and author in my project's readme.

Is this enough?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

Reading the second clause of the MIT license:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be
included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

So it follows that you should simply add a line with its new copyright date.

Copyright (c) 2000 author1 
              2013 author2

At any rate, the text of the clauses MIT itself is not copyrighted, and you may allow or not allow certain things in your code added, and can also close the project, but keeping the files available license to keep your project with a valid, MIT license.

Theoretically the MIT License and the most permissive of all, The publish their copyright is used mainly for set free the authors, which are keep without no warranty or liability, and is not only used to establish the authors credits.

In this article with legal advice on licensing open source, you can read about the successful implementation of multiple authors.


If you want to deploy only a small portion of code, and not create a fork of the project could have a double working solution for you:

  • As in some open source projects that implement small portions of code from other projects, the original files are simply isolated, leaving unchanged its copyright header.

  • Or in the case that you can not isolate the original code, then this mean your code represent an evolution of the original code and must use a header of multiple authors in your end file.

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1  
I'm not encapsulating entire files but only small pices of code, what about this way: I've created a CREDITS file in the root of my project where I've added for each library an explanation of what has been used , the type of license they're released under, a link to the original license (on the other project website or github repo) and a copy of the copyright notice like "copyright (c) 2008-2012 person name"; also above the "copied" code I've added a comment referencing the CREDITS files –  Matteo Pagliazzi Dec 28 '12 at 20:53
    
Really sounds right, but not always "morally right" is as "legally correct", Theoretically if it meets with this "... included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.", your license is valid and also your credits structure. At any rate, you also expect the response of Philippe Ombredanne, he is an expert about open source licenses. –  RTOSkit Dec 28 '12 at 22:22

IANAL and TINLA ...

Since both are released under the MIT license and you state the text of the license are the same, wherever you have your copy of the MIT license in your project you could add your own copyright on top, that should be enough.

Note that if your code is typically delivered in source form (say Python, Ruby or JavaScript) keeping the original notice in the code you reuse and redistribute would be enough to meet the requirements of the MIT license.

But a better practice would be to keep the original license text with original copyrights in the file you are reusing, with some additional comments explaining where you got it from as well as keep a copy in a top-level LICENSE or COPYRIGHTS file of sorts, usually side-by-side with your own license. An example of this can be found in Firefox: type about:license in the address bar. They include several libraries that use MIT-style licenses. Yet each MIT text is repeated once for each library. Chromium has the same approach: type chrome://credits/ in the address bar.

A good way to think about it would be how you would like to be credited when someone reuses your own library...

/HTH

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I'm not encapsulating entire files but only small pices of code, what about this way: I've created a CREDITS file in the root of my project where I've added for each library an explanation of what has been used , the type of license they're released under, a link to the original license (on the other project website or github repo) and a copy of the copyright notice like "copyright (c) 2008-2012 person name"; also above the "copied" code I've added a comment referencing the CREDITS files –  Matteo Pagliazzi Dec 28 '12 at 20:51
    
1 "up" for all the answer, but even more so for this: A good way to think about it would be how you would like to be credited when someone reuses your own library... –  RTOSkit Dec 28 '12 at 22:27

You should include both license notices. If you are releasing the project open source, then you should copy the outside license to the top of its source file and add a line above it saying "This license applies to this file." Alternatively, you could copy the outside license into the readme with a line saying "This license applies to the file xyz.ext"

Disclosure: I am not a lawyer. This is not legal advice.

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