Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to round dates/times to the nearest interval for a charting application. I'd like an extension method signature like follows so that the rounding can be acheived for any level of accuracy:

static DateTime Round(this DateTime date, TimeSpan span);

The idea is that if I pass in a timespan of ten minutes, it will round to the nearest ten minute interval. I can't get my head around the implementation and am hoping one of you will have written or used something similar before.

I think either a floor, ceiling or nearest implementation is fine.

Any ideas?

Edit: Thanks to @tvanfosson & @ShuggyCoUk, the implementation looks like this:

public static class DateExtensions {
    public static DateTime Round(this DateTime date, TimeSpan span) {
        long ticks = (date.Ticks + (span.Ticks / 2) + 1)/ span.Ticks;
        return new DateTime(ticks * span.Ticks);
    }
    public static DateTime Floor(this DateTime date, TimeSpan span) {
        long ticks = (date.Ticks / span.Ticks);
        return new DateTime(ticks * span.Ticks);
    }
    public static DateTime Ceil(this DateTime date, TimeSpan span) {
        long ticks = (date.Ticks + span.Ticks - 1) / span.Ticks;
        return new DateTime(ticks * span.Ticks);
    }
}

And is called like so:

DateTime nearestHour = DateTime.Now.Round(new TimeSpan(1,0,0));
DateTime minuteCeiling = DateTime.Now.Ceil(new TimeSpan(0,1,0));
DateTime weekFloor = DateTime.Now.Floor(new TimeSpan(7,0,0,0));
...

Cheers!

share|improve this question
    
Don't you want to provide examples? –  Viktor Jevdokimov Sep 8 '09 at 12:26
1  
Some of the implementations here might help too: stackoverflow.com/questions/766626/… –  Matt Hamilton Sep 8 '09 at 12:27
    
    
Thanks everyone for getting this up! This is perfectly what I was looking for so here are some upvotes :) –  ibiza Aug 22 '10 at 20:53
    
Dont forget to add the original DateTimeKind to the newly created date ex: new DateTime(ticks * span.Ticks, date.Kind); –  A. M. Nov 14 '13 at 17:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 74 down vote accepted

Floor

long ticks = date.Ticks / span.Ticks;

return new DateTime( ticks * span.Ticks );

Round (up on midpoint)

long ticks = (date.Ticks + (span.Ticks / 2) + 1)/ span.Ticks;

return new DateTime( ticks * span.Ticks );

Ceiling

long ticks = (date.Ticks + span.Ticks - 1)/ span.Ticks;

return new DateTime( ticks * span.Ticks );
share|improve this answer
    
your excellent edits will make my task of referencing you harder ;) –  ShuggyCoUk Sep 8 '09 at 16:47
1  
Round (up on midpoint) gives me strange values. E.g. if date is '01/01/2010 00:00:00' span is 5 secs I get '25/03/2014 06:13:25'. Think the code should be: long ticks = (date.Ticks + (span.Ticks / 2)) / span.Ticks; –  openshac Apr 8 '10 at 11:41
    
@openshac -- thanks for the correction. Cut/paste error. Note that I think you still need to add one to make sure that it rounds up. –  tvanfosson Apr 8 '10 at 11:51
1  
This is the best answer I've seen to all existing threads on this topic. –  Kevin Ortman Dec 2 '12 at 16:24
2  
I would rather use the mod operator over dividing and then multiplying. –  aj.toulan Dec 6 '13 at 20:46

You should also be clear if you want your rounding to:

  1. be to the start, end or middle of the interval
    • start is the easiest and often the expected but you should be clear in your initial spec.
  2. How you want boundary cases to round.
    • normally only an issue if you are rounding to the middle rather than the end.
    • Since rounding to the middle is an attempt at a bias free answer you need to use something like Bankers Rounding technically round half even to be truly free from bias.

It is quite likely that you really only care about the first point but in these 'simple' questions the resulting behaviour can have far reaching consequences as you use it in the real world (often at the intervals adjacent to zero)

tvanfosson's solution's cover all the cases listed in 1. The midpoint example is biased upwards. It is doubtful that this would be a problem in time related rounding.

share|improve this answer

This will let you round to any interval given, is slightly faster than dividing and then multiplying the ticks, and most importantly it's readable.

private static DateTime Floor(DateTime dateTime, TimeSpan interval)
{
  return dateTime.AddTicks(-(dateTime.Ticks % interval.Ticks));
}

private static DateTime Ceiling(DateTime dateTime, TimeSpan interval)
{
  return dateTime.AddTicks(interval.Ticks - (dateTime.Ticks % interval.Ticks));
}

private static DateTime Round(DateTime dateTime, TimeSpan interval)
{
  var halfIntervelTicks = (interval.Ticks + 1) >> 1;

  return dateTime.AddTicks(halfIntervelTicks - ((dateTime.Ticks + halfIntervelTicks) % interval.Ticks));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice! Except these are floor and ceiling functions, not rounding functions. You might want to name them as such. Can you add a midpoint rounding also? –  Matt Johnson Sep 13 '13 at 23:07
1  
The bit shift makes a 25% increase in speed on a x86 release, and less than a 5% increase on x64, opposed to a divide by two. I have an i5-2520M @ 2.5Ghz –  aj.toulan Sep 14 '13 at 18:12
2  
Stating that bit shift implementation is more readable than the divide implementation should only be considered as a personnal point of view :). Very nice speed improvement tho. –  A. M. Nov 14 '13 at 17:59
    
Question about my own code... I should assume that no one will put a TimeSpan.FromSeconds(0.0) as the interval parameter. If they do, this will cause a DivideByZeroException to be thrown by the mod operator. I assumed that this would be ok. If I were trying to round by a zero ticks TimeSpan, I personally would want this to break my code, considering this most likely means I made a mistake somewhere else. -- One could argue that it would be equally silly to round by TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1.0) since this operation would not make the returned value any different than the original DateTime. –  aj.toulan Dec 4 '13 at 18:34
    
@A.M. The more readable part I was referring to was the fact that subtracting by the modulus of the ticks on the TimeSpan is more expressive than dividing and then multiplying back. The latter method relies on truncation behaviors - I do agree that the bit shift is a little wonky, but it does give a significant performance boost and the variable name says what it does pretty clearly regardless. –  aj.toulan Dec 4 '13 at 18:59

Just use the Ticks, using that to divide, floor/ceil/round the value, and multiply it back.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.