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I have a list of properties setup in a class on a property that looks like:

[ValidatorComposition(CompositionType.Or, Ruleset = "BillingEmail", MessageTemplate = Constants.ERROR_INVALID_EMAILADDRESS)]
[NotNullValidator(Negated = true, Ruleset = "BillingEmail")]
[StringLengthValidator(0, RangeBoundaryType.Exclusive, 255, RangeBoundaryType.Inclusive, Ruleset = "BillingEmail")]
[RegexValidator(@"^[A-Z0-9._%-]+@(?:[A-Z0-9-]+\.)+[A-Z]{2,4}$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase, Ruleset = "BillingEmail")]
public string BillingEmailAddress { get; set; }

The issue I am having is that I enter:

someone@blah

and the email address still passes validation.

The rule I want is if the BillingEmailAddress is NULL, then it's VALID. However, if it's NOT NULL then the EmailAddress needs to verify string length and also pass the Regex Email validation.

Can someone tell me what is missing or I am doing wrong in this validation?

EDIT

Please be aware that this is not in a MVC model, but a class object. This property is part of a DTO and not the page model (the DataAnnotations classes aren't used at this layer).

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

I think the issue is that you can't nest multiple ValidatorComposition attributes.

You can definitely do what you want using a configuration based approach:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <configSections>
        <section name="validation" type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Configuration.ValidationSettings, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35" requirePermission="true" />
    </configSections>
    <validation>
        <type name="ConsoleApplication.Order" defaultRuleset="Validation Ruleset"
            assemblyName="ConsoleApplication, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null">
            <ruleset name="Validation Ruleset">
                <properties>
                    <property name="BillingEmailAddress">
                        <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.AndCompositeValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                            name="And Composite Validator">
                            <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.OrCompositeValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                name="Or Composite Validator">
                                <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.NotNullValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                    negated="true" name="Not Null Validator" />
                                <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.StringLengthValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                    upperBound="255" lowerBound="5" lowerBoundType="Exclusive"
                                    name="String Length Validator" />
                            </validator>
                            <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.OrCompositeValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                name="Or Composite Validator 2">
                                <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.NotNullValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                    negated="true" name="Not Null Validator" />
                                <validator type="Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation.Validators.RegexValidator, Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Validation, Version=5.0.505.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35"
                                    pattern="^[A-Z0-9._%-]+@(?:[A-Z0-9-]+\.)+[A-Z]{2,4}$" options="IgnoreCase"
                                    name="Regular Expression Validator" />
                            </validator>
                        </validator>
                    </property>
                </properties>
            </ruleset>
        </type>
    </validation>
</configuration>

You could also create nested validators programmatically. See the section Validating with a Composite Validator @ http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff953182(v=pandp.50).aspx .

An alternative might be to use multiple rulesets:

    [ValidatorComposition(CompositionType.Or, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringLength", MessageTemplate = Constants.ERROR_INVALID_EMAILADDRESS)]
    [StringLengthValidator(5, RangeBoundaryType.Exclusive, 255, RangeBoundaryType.Inclusive, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringLength")]
    [NotNullValidator(Negated = true, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringLength")]
    [ValidatorComposition(CompositionType.Or, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringFormat", MessageTemplate = Constants.ERROR_INVALID_EMAILADDRESS)]
    [RegexValidator(@"^[A-Z0-9._%-]+@(?:[A-Z0-9-]+\.)+[A-Z]{2,4}$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringFormat")]
    [NotNullValidator(Negated = true, Ruleset = "BillingEmailStringFormat")]
    public string BillingEmailAddress { get; set; }

Then you can specify multiple rulesets to validate:

var vrs = Validation.Validate(objectToValidate, 
              "BillingEmailStringLength", "BillingEmailStringFormat");

Yet another approach would be to create your own validators that handle null values.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the config approach which happened to be what I am using –  Kamal Apr 18 '13 at 11:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, thank you for all your solutions, however based on the link provided by Tuzo. I had to implement:

[HasSelfValidation]
public class SomeDTO
{
    public string BillingEmailAddress { get; set; }
}

to the class. I then had to implement:

[SelfValidation]
public void Validation(ValidationResults results)
{
    if (!Utility.IsValidEmailAddress(this.BillingEmailAddress))
    {
        results.AddResult(new ValidationResult(Constants.ERROR_INVALID_EMAILADDRESS, this, "", "", null));
    }
}

as a method to the class.

I hope this helps someone having the same issues.

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I've never had to do this myself but I think you can create your own DataAnnotations Validation context. See this post:

Check if Model is valid outside of Controller

Then you just need to make a validation attribute. I did something similar with email addresses in my application using a custom validator. Here is my code, modified to better suit your question.

public class MyEmailValidationAttribute : RegularExpressionAttribute
{
    public MyEmailValidationAttribute ()
        : base(@"^([\w\!\#$\%\&\'\*\+\-\/\=\?\^\`{\|\}\~]+\.)*[\w\!\#$\%\&\'\*\+\-\/\=\?\^\`{\|\}\~]+@((((([a-zA-Z0-9]{1}[a-zA-Z0-9\-]{0,62}[a-zA-Z0-9]{1})|[a-zA-Z])\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,6})|(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}(\:\d{1,5})?)$")
    {
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        Regex RegexObj = new Regex(this.Pattern);

        if (value == null)
        {
            return ValidationResult.Success;
        }           

        Match match = RegexObj.Match((string)value);

        if (!match.Success)
        {
            return new ValidationResult("Email not in correct format.");
        }

        return ValidationResult.Success;     
    }
}

Then in your model you just add:

//You may be able to remove some of your other attributes 
//by going this route so I won't include them all.
[MyEmailValidationAttribute()]
public string BillingEmailAddress { get; set; }
share|improve this answer
    
Edited to include reference to how you can do this outside of traditional view/controller action validation. –  Ben Tidman Dec 18 '12 at 21:52

Seeing someone doing validation through Attributes just hurts my eyes. Once again, I suggest using FluentValidation. Your model will be a lot cleaner and your validation will now look like this:

public class CustomerValidator: AbstractValidator<Customer>
{
    public CustomerValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(customer => customer.BillingEmailAddress)
            .NotEmpty()
            .WithMessage("You must specify Email Address.")
            .Length(1, 255)
            .WithMessage("Email address is too long.")
            .EmailAddress();
    }
}

This is regarding View Model. Now, to cover your requirement about the fact that this is a DTO. You can trigger validation separatelly like this:

Customer customer = // get your customer from whatever source
CustomerValidator validator = new CustomerValidator();
ValidationResult results = validator.Validate(customer);
if(results.Errors.Count() > 0)
    // do whatever in case your customer class does not validate
share|improve this answer
    
It's ironic, because I think creating a validator for each property is a ton of work and maintenance nightmare. But no matter which way I turn it, it look like I have to do something like this because I'm just not getting the results I want with attributes/config settings. –  Sean Dec 19 '12 at 22:28

There is a NullIgnoringValidatorWrapper Class.

share|improve this answer
    
Link-only answers are discouraged here at Stack Overflow. Perhaps show how the NullIgnoringValidatorWrapper class can be used to solve the OP's problem and provide the link for reference. –  drs Jul 3 '14 at 16:11

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