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I'm trying to make some project in C.

I would like to know if it is possible to make #include from the same file twice, in a way that recalls diamond heritage.

i.e.

  • in a.c there is #include "a.h"
  • in b.c there is #include "b.h"
  • in b.h there is #include "a.h"

Is it possible to #include "b.h" in a.c?

I get an error:

some_variable already defined in a.obj
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1  
Look for "include guards" –  cnicutar Dec 18 '12 at 16:41
    
Simple: don't define variables in headers, just declare them. –  Paul R Dec 18 '12 at 16:41
    
@PaulR how do you declare int in header without defining it? –  icepack Dec 18 '12 at 16:42
1  
@icepack: use extern. –  Paul R Dec 18 '12 at 16:43
    
@PaulR yes, silly me :) –  icepack Dec 18 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Simple: don't define variables in headers, just declare them:

Header:

// a.h

#ifndef A_H             // always use #include guards
#define A_H

extern int my_variable; // declare my_variable

...

#endif

Source file a.c:

// a.c

#include "a.h"

int my_variable;        // define my_variable

...

Source file b.c:

// a.c

#include "a.h"
#include "b.h"

...

As others have mentioned, #include guards are useful, and a good habit to get into, but they are probably not the solution for this specific problem.

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I already use the "#include guards", It doesn't help, I'll try your solution –  hudac Dec 18 '12 at 16:51

You have to declare extern the variables in a.h, then modify your header a.h in the following way:

 #ifndef a_h
 #define a_h

   //your a.h 

 #endif
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I already use the "#include guards", It doesn't help –  hudac Dec 18 '12 at 16:52

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