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Using only HTML, CSS, and Javascript, has the web development world got to a stage where it is possible to display a loading message on the screen until absolutely everything has downloaded before the web page is displayed on the screen?

For example, display "loading", until all html, css, javascript, images etc etc have downloaded and can be displayed without the user seeing bits of the website still appearing after the load message has gone?

UPDATE, .LOAD DOESN'T WORK:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta charset="utf-8">
        <title></title>

        <script  type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.8.3.min.js"></script>

        <script type="text/javascript">

            $(document).load(function(){

                alert("loaded");

            });

        </script>
    </head>
    <body>

    </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Typically you would do this with JS. When the page is loading display something and when the page has loaded, hide it. To be honest, you should probably rethink your strategy if your page takes ages to download, otherwise noones going to be interested. –  Alex Dec 18 '12 at 17:11
    
'display "loading", until all html, css, javascript, images etc etc have downloaded and can be displayed without the user seeing bits of the website still appearing after the load message has gone' <- what would be the purpose of this? Is there something wrong with the familiar queues the browser gives about the status of the document? –  cimmanon Dec 18 '12 at 17:12
    
Please see the update in my question. The .load is not generating the alert at all. Apparently .load has been deprecated? api.jquery.com/category/events/document-loading –  oshirowanen Dec 19 '12 at 9:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Absolutely this will be achieved with jQuery and javascript no doubt:

$(function(){

    $('body').addClass('loader'); // this will show the loading gif

    $(window).load(function(){
        $('body').removeClass('loader'); // remove the loader when window gets loaded.
        $('#wrapper').show();    // show the wrapper div after everything loaded.
    });

});
share|improve this answer
    
ok let me show you a fiddle about it, plz wait. –  Jai Dec 19 '12 at 9:40
    
see this url but make sure you clear the browser cache and cookies : jsfiddle.net/b8bTA –  Jai Dec 19 '12 at 9:52
    
Please see the update in my question. The .load is not generating the alert at all. Apparently .load has been deprecated? api.jquery.com/category/events/document-loading –  oshirowanen Dec 19 '12 at 9:58
1  
have you tried this : $(window).load –  Jai Dec 19 '12 at 10:00
    
Ah, that was it. I was using document.load instead of window.load. Thanks. –  oshirowanen Dec 19 '12 at 10:04

you can use $(window).load()

$(window).load(function(){
    alert("");
})
share|improve this answer
    
If using jQuery... –  Alex Dec 18 '12 at 17:07
    
What do you mean? and reason for down vote? –  Adil Dec 18 '12 at 17:08
    
Please see the update in my question. The .load is not generating the alert at all. Apparently .load has been deprecated? api.jquery.com/category/events/document-loading –  oshirowanen Dec 19 '12 at 9:56
1  
You can use $(window).load, I have updated my answer, document .load is not working could be the reason told by @oshirowanen –  Adil Dec 19 '12 at 10:02

"...until absolutely everything has downloaded before the web page is displayed on the screen"

This is not possible due to how browsers render HTML. The browser will start rendering (and actually drawing) the page BEFORE everything is downloaded.

If you want to implement something like that, there're some possibilities. E.g. you could load just en "empty" page at first, then load your "real" content via an AJAX request. This way you could even track the progress of the AJAX load using some now available techniques and only display (inject into the DOM) your real content when that finished downloading.

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This is incorrect. The window.onload event fires only when all recourses have been loaded; including things like images. Are confusing it with the document.ready event? –  Halcyon Dec 18 '12 at 17:09
    
What you are saying is incorrect is not what I said OR what he wants. He asked if can make the browser not to start drawing the page until everything is downloaded. Or at least this is what I understood reading the question. –  marekful Dec 18 '12 at 17:18
    
However @Jai's answer is correct. I didn't think of the trivial solution when you simply "hide" (display: none) your container division so even though the browser does render and draw before all downloads finished, the user won't see it until window.onload unhides the wrapper. –  marekful Dec 18 '12 at 17:21
    
I don't know what it said before, now it says he wants a 'loading' message. window.onload is still the event to listen for. –  Halcyon Dec 18 '12 at 17:24
    
Please see the update in my question. The .load is not generating the alert at all. Apparently .load has been deprecated? api.jquery.com/category/events/document-loading –  oshirowanen Dec 19 '12 at 9:57

Yes, <body> has a onLoad property described here, for example:

<script type="text/javascript">
function done() {
    document.getElementById("loadingtext").innerHTML = "";
}
</script>

<body onload="done()">
<div id="loadingtext">Loading...</div>

But then, of course, it's easier to use a framework.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't recommend w3schools as a reference, it's wrong as often as it's right and the quality is erratic. This is not how you should be adding events to the DOM. Use jQuery or the native addEventListener. –  Halcyon Dec 18 '12 at 17:02
    
Really? Oh well sorry... I just mentioned onLoad because he specifically asked "Using only HTML, CSS, and Javascript", so I thought no jQuery involved. –  Augusto Men Dec 18 '12 at 17:06
    
addEventListener is the native function you should use. This is what jQuery uses, it just has a more accessible API :) –  Halcyon Dec 18 '12 at 17:08
    
Right, but then again you'd have some browser compatibility issues. –  Augusto Men Dec 18 '12 at 17:11
1  
Yes, so use a framework such as jQuery :D –  Halcyon Dec 18 '12 at 17:16

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