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I am currently writing a program but I found a problem. The problem is that in this loop below all instances of the class Person are attached to one instance of Item. What I want is that a Person each have his own Item. Do you have any suggestions?

Class simulate:

public void simulate(int days){

    for(int i=0;i<days;i++) {

        int persons = 10;

        for(int j=0;j<persons;j++){

            Person person = new Person();

            Item item = new Item();

            person.setItem(item);
        }
     }
 }

Class Person:

private Item item;

public void setItem(Item item)
{
        this.item = item;
}
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You create a new Object each iteration, so each Person does have their own Object. getObject() should probably be called setObject() –  Hunter McMillen Dec 18 '12 at 17:02
7  
getObject() for a setter is confusing. –  hmjd Dec 18 '12 at 17:03
    
new Person; should be new Person();. Same for Object. Rest seems to be fine, except that your getObject method should be setObject. –  Rohit Jain Dec 18 '12 at 17:03
    
Sorry, that's what I get for coding in this editor. I hope the typo's are gone and we can continue with the problem. –  Nfear Dec 18 '12 at 17:13
    
Your latest version should work. –  Dims Dec 18 '12 at 17:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What I want is that a Person each have his own Item.

But that's exactly what you're doing. You're creating instances of Person and each newly created instance receives an newly created instance of Item

for(int j=0;j<persons;j++){
  Person person = new Person();
  Item item = new Item();
  person.setItem(item);
}

Only that you do not keep references to all those objects that have been created. So they'll be garbage collected sooner or later. Your loop is equivalent to

for(int j=0;j<persons;j++){
  new Person().setItem(new Item());
}
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I suspect your get should be a set

For all the Person objects to be using the same object, you would have to have made your field static. Don't do that, remove the static keyword from this field. I suggest you not make your fields static unless they are constants (where possible)

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Your code is all kinds of wrong, and I'm sure it doesn't compile.

If you want to build a Person object with a parameter of type object being passed on the constructor, you need to do:

Object someKindOfObject = new Object(); //should really be a specific type...
Person person = new Person(sometKindOfObject);

A getSomething method should NEVER change the state of the object, just return information about it. If you don't want to use the constructor option, create a setObject method.

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Where you are storing the person objects?Each time you are over-writing the person object with new reference.So coming out of loop, you will be having a single object reference.Here is the corrected code which you are expecting i guess;-)

public void simulate(int days){

    for(int i=0;i<days;i++) {

        int persons = 10;

        Person[] personArray = new Person[persons];

        for(int j=0;j<persons;j++){

            personArray[j] = new Person();

            Object object = new Object();

            personArray[j].setObject(object);
        }

//here you have the reference to all person objects in array
     }
 }

class Person

public void setObject(Object object)
{
        this.object = object;
}
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Now the code looks working or the problem is not evident. The OP should present more details about what error he/she receives.

Error in initial post was here:

public void getObject(Object Object)
{
        this.object = object;
}

you should name formal parameter object instead of Object, i.e. write

public void getObject(Object object)

instead of

public void getObject(Object Object)

Java is case sensitive.

Line this.object = object; does nothing in your code since assigning field object to itself. Separate variable Object plays no role. And you should get warning about it.

Also you'd better name method setObject.

share|improve this answer
    
this.object = object; is perfectly fine... assuming the rest of his code wasn't full of typos. –  Jon7 Dec 18 '12 at 17:06
    
this.object = object assigns object to the a field of the current object referenced by this. –  Hunter McMillen Dec 18 '12 at 17:07
    
@Jon7 no you are wrong. this.object=object WOULD be fine if there were object local variable. But it is not. –  Dims Dec 18 '12 at 17:07
    
@Hunter, you are wrong too. Look at the spelling of formal parameter carefully. –  Dims Dec 18 '12 at 17:07
    
Keep in mind, that line is in a different class. A class that he hasn't given us. So we have no idea if there's a local variable. –  Jon7 Dec 18 '12 at 17:07

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