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If I understand this right, do I have to use the table adapters to get data into my typed data set, I can't just create my strongly typed data-set and have the data autoload? (im also using a .net 3.5 project in VS2012)

for example, I have to do this to get data (If I do it this way, i get data)

 var a = new V7RTLEvtDataSetTableAdapters.tblFileTableAdapter();
  a.GetData();

versus just doing this, (if I do it this way, I get nothing... and I could understand if its lazy loading...??)

V7RTLEvtDataSet o = new V7RTLEvtDataSet();
var r = o.tblFile.Select();
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3 Answers 3

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The much maligned, much misunderstood strongly typed dataset! Typically yes you would use a tableadapter to load the data, and to perform updates. Using the designer you would add parameter queries to the table adapter to support the operations your program requires eg 'select * from customers where customerid = @customerid'

Call this FillbyCustomerid.

Then you would pull the data for the selected customer using the tableadapter by something along the lines of: dim ta as new dscustomerstableadapters.customertableadapter dim ds as new dsCustomers ta.fillbycustomerid (ds.customers, ourid)

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I think I am understanding these data sets more and more, I was hoping to find more of a data-set, that has a living connection with the back-end access database, so that tables would be auto loaded (or at least the first time they are need), and changes made via the data set (via the datatable), would be immediately view able, in the db. –  nagates Jan 8 '13 at 17:07
    
well, datasets don't work like that. They are essentially 'Disconnected' - you pull the data into it, work on it, then submit your update. (Datasets seem to have a really bad reputation on SO - see some of the other replies - but also on SO it appears many of the people who rubbish them do not actually know how to use them.) –  peterG Jan 9 '13 at 21:08
    
yea, they seem to be more of snapshot, however, when working with legacy Access files, its probably my best option. –  nagates Jan 9 '13 at 21:17
    
You might want to look at pulling data using the datareader object, and updating using sqlcommands, if you are looking for something more immediate. There are many other approaches, both within and without ADO.Net. –  peterG Jan 9 '13 at 21:18
    
Ref 'snapshot' I guess w/e technology you use, ultimately you are pulling the data into your application, working on it and then sending it back. There's always going to be an update command somewhere - it's not going to get there any other way. Anyhow, datasets are a perfectly reasonable way of interacting with an Access database. The thing that people often miss is you should create parameter queries in your tableadapters to pull only the data you want- frequently people seem to think you pull the entire table into the ds. No. Meanwhile I'd go for SQL Express instead of Access tho if poss. –  peterG Jan 9 '13 at 21:25
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All DataSets (type and untyped) are database-agnostic, ie any DataTable can be filled from Oracle just as easy as from MS-Sql. The DataSet has no knowledge of schema or connection strings.

You need an Adapter to read to/from a backing store.

(And DataTable.Select() is probably from Linq-to-Datasets).

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That just seems odd that it would go through the effort of adding a connection string to my settings, can I use linq on my typed dataset? am I going to load each table one at a time, or is there a way to mass fill at once? –  nagates Dec 18 '12 at 19:23
    
You can only use Linq after filling the Dataset. And the most practical way to do that is with an Adapter. –  Henk Holterman Dec 18 '12 at 20:22
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BEST usage of typed dataset: Ignore, never use. Go OTM instead. Use LINQ. Datasets - typed and untyped - where bad when they were in .NET 1.0, since then even MS has realized alternatives. Not used one in 10 years, not going to use one.

Exception: Reporting applications where the SQL is "entered externally", so you basically just Need a generic data Container.

Use EntityFramework or one of the tons of alternatives.

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I'm using an old Access Db, so my options are limited. –  nagates Dec 18 '12 at 19:14
    
But im open to alternatives if you have them? –  nagates Dec 18 '12 at 19:23
    
@NateGates Not sure. I don't deal with access for 10 years. Crap is not something i ever deal with. And sorry, that is what access is. Ever since SQL CE there is hardly any scenario where access is not just something just outdated. No idea - you could try NHibernate. –  TomTom Dec 18 '12 at 19:25
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