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I need to calculate averages, standard deviations, medians etc for a bunch of numerical data. Is there a good open source .NET library I can use? I have found NMath but it is not free and may be overkill for my needs.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Feb 12 '12 at 15:47

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

12  
I'll never understand why some people consider this to be "not constructive" given its interest and number of answers! – Calanus Feb 23 '12 at 9:06
1  
@Calanus yes, bizarre. Lots of good info in the answers as well. Probably it is because of the word "recommend" in the title. – Mark Heath Feb 23 '12 at 14:20
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I found this on the CodeProject website. It looks like a good C# class for handling most of the basic statistical functions.

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8  
Yuck! Why do some people persist in writing method/class name in lowercase and not PascalCase; it just makes the code look wrong. – Callum Rogers Jun 1 '10 at 19:11

You have to be careful. There are several ways to compute standard deviation that would give the same answer if floating point arithmetic were perfect. They're all accurate for some data sets, but some are far better than others under some circumstances.

The method I've seen proposed here is the one that is most likely to give bad answers. I used it myself until it crashed on me.

See Comparing three methods of computing standard deviation.

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1  
Good information worth an up-vote. – mistrmark Mar 16 '09 at 23:02

Have a look at MathNet it is not specifically for statistics, but there might be useful functionality for what you want

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I decided it was quicker to write my own, that just did what I needed. Here's the code...

/// <summary>
/// Very basic statistical analysis routines
/// </summary>
public class Statistics
{
    List<double> numbers;
    public double Sum { get; private set; }
    public double Min { get; private set; }
    public double Max { get; private set; }
    double sumOfSquares;

    public Statistics()
    {
        numbers = new List<double>();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return numbers.Count; }
    }

    public void Add(double number)
    {
        if(Count == 0)
        {
            Min = Max = number;
        }
        numbers.Add(number);
        Sum += number;
        sumOfSquares += number * number;
        Min = Math.Min(Min,number);
        Max = Math.Max(Max,number);            
    }

    public double Average
    {
        get { return Sum / Count; }
    }

    public double StandardDeviation
    {
        get { return Math.Sqrt(sumOfSquares / Count - (Average * Average)); }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// A simplistic implementation of Median
    /// Returns the middle number if there is an odd number of elements (correct)
    /// Returns the number after the midpoint if there is an even number of elements
    /// Sorts the list on every call, so should be optimised for performance if planning
    /// to call lots of times
    /// </summary>
    public double Median
    {
        get
        {
            if (numbers.Count == 0)
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Can't calculate the median with no data");
            numbers.Sort();
            int middleIndex = (Count) / 2;
            return numbers[middleIndex];
        }
    }
}
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5  
That algorithm works in theory, and often works in practice. But see this post for an example of where that algorithm can fail. johndcook.com/blog/2008/09/26/… – John D. Cook Apr 26 '09 at 13:28
    
@JohnD.Cook thanks for the useful information. For the data I was using, the method above works fine. How about posting us a short C# sample with your recommended algorithm? – Mark Heath Feb 23 '12 at 14:26

Apache Maths.Common and run it through IKVM.

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Apache Maths.Common is so much more well documented than any other statistics API I've found. Compiling it to a .NET DLL via IKVM was a snap. Thanks so much for the suggestion! – Roy Tinker Feb 24 '12 at 18:32

AForge.NET has AForge.Math namespace, providing some basic statistics functions: Histogram, mean, median, stddev, entropy.

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If you just need to do some one-off number crunching, a spreadsheet is far and away your best tool. It's trivial to spit out a simple CSV file from C#, which you can then load up in Excel (or whatever):

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("output.csv", false, Encoding.ASCII))
        {
            WriteCsvLine(sw, new List<string>() { "Name", "Length", "LastWrite" });

            DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(".");
            foreach (FileInfo fi in di.GetFiles("*.mp3", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
            {
                List<string> columns = new List<string>();
                columns.Add(fi.Name.Replace(",", "<comma>"));
                columns.Add(fi.Length.ToString());
                columns.Add(fi.LastWriteTime.Ticks.ToString());

                WriteCsvLine(sw, columns);
            }
        }
    }

    static void WriteCsvLine(StreamWriter sw, List<string> columns)
    {
        sw.WriteLine(string.Join(",", columns.ToArray()));
    }
}

Then you can just 'start excel output.csv' and use functions like "=MEDIAN(B:B)", "=AVERAGE(B:B)", "=STDEV(B:B)". You get charts, histograms (if you install the analysis pack), etc.

The above doesn't handle everything; generalized CSV files are more complex than you might think. But it's "good enough" for much of the analysis I do.

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