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Interface should be used when none of the implementation details are available to the current scope of the code.

Abstracts should be used when some of the implementation details are available to you.

Query - Why still these terms are required? Why can't Business objects directly communicate with DataAccess.SqlServer Layer?

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closed as not a real question by musefan, duffymo, jonsca, Jack, kmp Dec 18 '12 at 18:52

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Better layering, better abstraction, looser coupling - need I go on? –  duffymo Dec 18 '12 at 17:43
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Sorry dude... This is too open for opinion... You're likely gonna get this closed because the question is too open... But to duffymo's point, loose coupling is a major reason... If you're asking this question, I suspect you've never lived through the hell of a large project refactoring. –  Rikon Dec 18 '12 at 17:46
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I think your question would fit better at programmers.stackexchange.com –  Fabio Gouw Dec 18 '12 at 17:48
    
By all means, put all your code in one big object. What's stopping you? –  duffymo Dec 18 '12 at 18:02
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@Rikon Fair enough. Thanks for the explanation. If it's a good question now, what about voting to reopen it? –  Bob Horn Dec 19 '12 at 13:41
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1 Answer

Interface should be used when none of the implementation details are available to the current scope of the code.

Not really. What you're referring to is encapsulation. There is the concept of "information expert." Only the class that knows how to do something should be the one doing it. Interfaces are used for polymorphism and decoupling. When consuming code wants to treat certain types of objects the same way, that code can use all of those objects the same way by treating them as the interface type.

Abstracts should be used when some of the implementation details are available to you

I'm not sure what you mean here. I think you're confused because this doesn't sound right. Abstract classes are used the same way interfaces are, except that they're allowed to have implementation in them.

Query - Why still these terms are required? Why can't Business objects directly communicate with DataAccess.SqlServer Layer?

They can, but at the cost of maintainability, flexibility, and testability. If you want to replace your data layer with another, you can't because the consuming code has a direct dependency on the current data layer. If you want to unit test your logic, you can't without hitting the DB. If you put your database classes behind an interface, you could mock the data layer in unit testing and test your logic classes without hitting the database.

Very Short Example

public Foo FooLogic
{
    IFooData fooData = DataAccessFactory.GetDataClass<IFooData>();
    return fooData.GetFoo();
}

Now your logic class isn't tied to a particular data class. The factory can return a real FooData implementation, or it can return a mock data object, or a new data access layer can be put in place without affecting the code in the logic class.

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+1. can you give a very short example for the last paragraph ? –  abcdefghi Dec 18 '12 at 18:49
    
@ytftyffty Done. Hope it helps. –  Bob Horn Dec 18 '12 at 20:39
    
@abcdefghi Did that help you? –  Bob Horn Dec 19 '12 at 16:08
    
NO. I could not understand the real reason to add it. –  abcdefghi Dec 24 '12 at 10:22
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