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Suppose I've got two classes A and B such that B extends A, respectively implementing method getA and getB that has the same input parameter types and same return type (but different names). In a method public static <T extends A> void print(T t) getting as input an object of type A or B, I want to call getA if the object is of type A or getB if the object is of type B.

If I could edit the code of A and B I would make them implement an interface I providing getValue() (in the implementation for A and B, getValue() would call getA() and getB() resp.), and then call this method from print(). Problem is: classes A and B are not modifiable!. No methods can be added or changed, their class hierarchy is fixed, I didn't write their code, and I don't have access to the source.

Note that this also applies to the cases when - for any reason - I don't want to change the code of A and B.

Is there any way of doing so without the use of instanceof?

Here follows a solution that uses instanceof (bad!).

public class Test {

    public static <T extends A> void print(T t){
        if (t instanceof B)
            System.out.println(((B)t).getB());
        else if (t instanceof A)
            System.out.println(t.getA());
    }

    public static class A {
        public String getA(){
            return "A";
        }
    }
    public static class B extends A {
        public String getB(){
            return "B";
        }
    }

}

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if yu can't muck with A/B and you can't subclass them, then this is your only option. you were hoping for some other magic? –  jtahlborn Dec 18 '12 at 18:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To extend Matt's answer, I would consider adopting the Facade Pattern for these classes. This means you create a separate class (or two) to wrap all the functionality you require from these two classes. This includes adding a method, as Matt suggests.

The benefit is you decouple your application from an API you have no control over. You also have an opportunity to simplify the API, if you don't require all the methods from the original libraries.

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When you don't have access to the original code for whatever reason, you end up having to fall back on things like instanceof. In these cases, it's not bad per se - your hands are tied.

What I would do is to create a wrapper class that is genericized on your T, give it a getValue that tests with instanceof as you proposed, and make it clear that the only reason this class exists is to provide a consistent interface for using either an A or a B. It's still gross, but you've contained the grossness in one place.

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this would depend on how much control you have over the creation of the classes. –  jtahlborn Dec 18 '12 at 18:29

Thank you and @Matt. Guess this one is definitely the cleanest way. Will provide the full code that does not make use of instanceof:

public static void main(String[] args){
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();
    AWrapper aw = new AWrapper(a);
    BWrapper bw = new BWrapper(b);
    print(aw);
    print(bw);
}

public static void print(Wrapper t){
    System.out.println(t.getValue());
}

public static class A {
    public String getA(){
        return "A";
    }
}
public static class B extends A {
    public String getB(){
        return "B";
    }
}

public static interface Wrapper{
    public String getValue();
}

public static class AWrapper implements Wrapper{
    A a;
    public AWrapper (A a){
        this.a = a;
    }
    public String getValue(){
        return a.getA();
    }
}

public static class BWrapper implements Wrapper{
    B b;
    public BWrapper (B b){
        this.b = b;
    }
    public String getValue(){
        return b.getB();
    }
}
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