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Table DEPARTMEnT

Table DEPARTMET

TABLE EMPLOYEE

enter image description here

There is the Operations Department which has not any employee. So, i believed that the query would retrieved also the row(image 1):

Department_ID=10 , Department_Name =Operations, Employee=0

Why doesnt happen???

 SELECT EMPLOYEE.Department_ID, DEPARTMENT.Department_Name, Count(*) AS Employees 
FROM EMPLOYEE right JOIN DEPARTMENT ON DEPARTMENT.Department_ID = EMPLOYEE.Department_ID
GROUP BY DEPARTMENT.Department_Name,.EMPLOYEE.Department_ID
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the principal data you care about for this query is coming from the DEPARTMENT table, you may want to consider rewriting your query to be:

SELECT DEPARTMENT.Department_ID, DEPARTMENT.Department_Name, Count(EMPLOYEE.Employee_ID) As Employees 
FROM DEPARTMENT 
LEFT JOIN EMPLOYEE ON EMPLOYEE.Department_ID = DEPARTMENT.Department_ID 
GROUP BY DEPARTMENT.Department_ID, DEPARTMENT.Department_Name
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it but the result was Department_ID=null , Department_Name =Operations, Employee=1(that cannot happen) – apkos99 Dec 18 '12 at 19:12
    
Right - that would be the result for this case. I rewrote your query for what I believe you're looking for. – nybbler Dec 18 '12 at 19:23
    
that works great ..thanks – apkos99 Dec 18 '12 at 19:24

The default join is an inner join, which only returns rows for which at least one row is found on both sides. Replace join with left join to retrieve departments without employees.

Example code:

SELECT  e.Department_ID
,       d.Department_Name
,       count(e.Employee_ID) AS Employees 
FROM    Department d
LEFT JOIN
        Employee e
ON      d.Department_ID = e.Department_ID
GROUP BY 
        d.Department_ID
,       d.Department_Name
share|improve this answer
    
i replaced it but a get the same outputs – apkos99 Dec 18 '12 at 19:04
    
Uh, I see department is the right-hand table. Try a right join instead of a left join ? – Andomar Dec 18 '12 at 19:06
    
I tried it but the result was Department_ID=null , Department_Name =Operations, Employee=1(that cannot happen) – apkos99 Dec 18 '12 at 19:10
1  
That's because you retrieve the department id from the employee record. An easy fix would be to change select employee.department_id, ... to select department.department_id, ... – Andomar Dec 18 '12 at 19:15

This should do the trick. You could put in a RIGHT JOIN if you have the EMPLOYEE table first, but the reason this is not good is because soon your queries will start being a mix of LEFT and RIGHT joins, which becomes very hard to read, even for seasoned SQL professionals. By sticking with LEFT JOIN you keep the query maintainable and understandable. (In very rare circumstances RIGHT JOIN may simplify a query that has a complex order of precedence but I have only done it something like twice to avoid having to add parentheses around groups of joins).

SELECT
   D.Department_ID,
   D.Department_Name,
   Employees = Count(*) 
FROM
   dbo.DEPARTMENT D
   LEFT JOIN dbo.EMPLOYEE E
      ON D.Department_ID = E.Department_ID
GROUP BY
   D.Department_ID,
   D.Department_Name

Also, I recommend that you use aliases for your tables instead of full table names. The query becomes much easier to scan and understand when there is consistent use of aliases. Spelling out the entire table name all too often obscures other parts of the query.

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