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I have the following String:

String str = "\nHERE\n\nTHERE\n\nEVERYWHERE\n\n";

If you just print this, it would output like this (Of course the \n wouldn't be "literally" printed):

\n
HERE\n
\n
THERE\n
\n
EVERYWHERE\n
\n
\n

When I call the method split("\n"), I want to get all the strings between the new line (\n) characters even the empty strings at the end.

For example, if I did this:

String strArray[] = str.split("\n");

System.out.println("strArray.length - " + strArray.length);
for(int i = 0; i < strArray.length; i++)
    System.out.println("strArray[" + i + "] - \"" + strArray[i] + "\"");

I want it to print out like this (Output A):

strArray.length - 8
strArray[0] - ""
strArray[1] - "HERE"
strArray[2] - ""
strArray[3] - "THERE"
strArray[4] - ""
strArray[5] - "EVERYWHERE"
strArray[6] - ""
strArray[7] - ""

In reality, it prints like this (Output B):

strArray.length - 6
strArray[0] - ""
strArray[1] - "HERE"
strArray[2] - ""
strArray[3] - "THERE"
strArray[4] - ""
strArray[5] - "EVERYWHERE"

How do I make the split() method include the empty strings like in Output A? I, of course, could write a multi-line piece of code, but wanted to know, before I waste my time trying to implement that, if there was a simple method or an extra two or so lines of code to help me. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 34 down vote accepted

use str.split("\n", -1) (with a negative limit argument). When split is given zero or no limit argument it discards trailing empty fields, and when it's given a positive limit argument it limits the number of fields to that number, but a negative limit means to allow any number of fields and not discard trailing empty fields. This is documented here and the behavior is taken from Perl.

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The one-argument split method is specified to ignore trailing empty string splits but the version that takes a "limit" argument preserves them, so one option would be to use that version with a large limit.

String strArray[] = str.split("\n", Integer.MAX_VALUE);
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Do you know the syntax to do this? –  Rob Avery IV Dec 18 '12 at 19:11
1  
+1 ideone.com/BQRyII –  mellamokb Dec 18 '12 at 19:13
1  
using negative limit is better than using max int imho –  dermoritz Jul 4 '14 at 6:57

Personally, I like the Guava utility for splitting:

System.out.println(Iterables.toString(
   Splitter.on('\n').split(input)));

Then if you want to configure empty string behaviour, you can do so:

System.out.println(Iterables.toString(
   Splitter.on('\n').omitEmptyStrings().split(input))); 
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