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I'm writing a bit of code, and there is a part that gives me hassles. I'm having the following structure in my code:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
    try
    {
        bool n = node.previous == null;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
        {
            StreamWriter s = new StreamWriter("error.txt");
            s.WriteLine(e.Message);
            s.WriteLine("-----------");
            s.Close();
        }
}

In here Node is a custom type, the node.prev variable is also a custom type (Location). Running this gives the following error-log:

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
-----------

I'm 100% sure that node isn't null (which should be made impossible by foreach = Not true, sorry!). Also, as you can see in the following listing, the Node.previous is set to null at declaration:

public class Node
{
    public Location previous = null;
    public Location location;
    public int distance;
    ...
    ...
}

I have no idea how I can fix these exeptions occuring, and I'm kind of at the end of having any ideas on how to solve this. Can anybody help me with this?

Note that these are all not the final code, but I sifted the parts that didn't matter!

Thanks in advance, Delpee

EDIT: Ricovox helped me to the solution with this answer, thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Maybe node is null? –  JeremyWeir Dec 18 '12 at 19:05
4  
1) Which line is throwing the exception? 2) If you don't know where the error is happening how do you know the rest of the code doesn't matter? –  Rotem Dec 18 '12 at 19:05
    
Have you put a breakpoint on that line of code? What are the values? Is nodes null? –  Wonko the Sane Dec 18 '12 at 19:05
    
I would set a breakpoint in your foreach line and see whether my nodes has members or not! you can trace what is happening using System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("current node:"+ node.Location.ToString()+...); –  IT Seeker Dec 18 '12 at 19:08
    
I can't put a breakpoint, because this is for Google's AI challenge, which has a weird system making it impossible to debug the classical way. I know this is the problem because this is where the exception is caught. –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:10
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So I'm posting another answer in response to your comment:

"I have checked for node being null, it isn't, at any point."

If that IS true, there here are some other options;

  1. Take a look at the node.previous class/struct definition. It COULD implement a CUSTOM == operator that throws an error when compared to null. As an example, think about the Nullable<T> type. It has an overloaded == operator that returns true if the HasValue property is false (obviously, since it is a struct it isn't truly null, but overloading the operator gives the desired behavior.) To fix this, you could test object.ReferenceEquals(node.previous, null) which wouldn't be overloaded. If you have access to change the node.previous definition, perhaps you can find out why the overloaded operator throws an exception when compared to null (which it obviously shouldn't)

  2. nodes could be null, in which case it is the foreach statement that is throwing the error. Test nodes == null before the foreach.

---------------Edit---------------

As Jeppe pointed out, my analogy with Nullable<T> (in option #1, above) could be misleading (in fact it did confuse the discussion, although the point itself was correct). In order to better illustrate the idea of overriding the == operator, I've posted an example below that demonstrates the Container type. This type is a struct, so it can never be null itself, but it contains a single Value object. (The point of this struct is that you can work with any Container object without worrying whether or not it is null, even though the contained Value object might be null). The main thing to note is that when a Container is compared with == to null, the result will be true if Value is null, which would NOT be true if the == operator weren't overridden (because a struct can never be null).

public struct Container {
    public object Value { get; set; }
    public bool IsNull { get { return Value == null; } }
    public static bool operator ==(Container x, object y) { return x.Equals(y); }
    public static bool operator !=(Container x, object y) { return !x.Equals(y); }
    public override bool Equals(object obj) {
        if (obj is Container)
            return Value == ((Container)obj).Value;
        return Value == obj;
    }
    public override int GetHashCode() { return Value == null ? 0 : Value.GetHashCode(); }
}

////---------Test----------
var x = new Container { Value = null };
var y = new Container { Value = "hi" };
var z = new Container { Value = null };
Print(x == null); //true 
Print(x == y);    //false
Print(x == z);    //true

And just in case you are wondering how overriding == would affect a class, I've written another example below that demonstrates a Box class. It's similar to the Container struct, except that we have to deal with the case in which the Box object is null itself. Note that in this case, there is another surprising result of overriding ==. Two reference types can be equal (==) to each other, even if they reference different objects, as long as they have equal Value properties.

public class Box {
    public static bool ItemsEqual(object x, object y) {
        object xval, yval;
        xval = x is Box ? (x as Box).Value : x;
        yval = y is Box ? (y as Box).Value : y;
        return xval == yval;
    }
    public object Value { get; set; }
    public bool IsNull { get { return Value == null; } }
    public static bool operator ==(Box x, object y) { return ItemsEqual(x, y); }
    public static bool operator !=(Box x, object y) { return !ItemsEqual(x, y); }
    public override bool Equals(object obj) { return ItemsEqual(this, obj); }
    public override int GetHashCode() { return Value == null ? 0 : Value.GetHashCode(); }
}

////---------Test----------
object n = null;
Box w = null;
Box x = new Box { Value = null };
Box y = new Box { Value = "hi" };
Box z = new Box { Value = "hi" };

Print(w == null);  //true (uses overridden '==' because w is defined as a Box)
Print(w == n);     //true
Print(x == w);     //true 
Print(x == null);  //true 
Print(x == n);     //true 

Print(w == y);    //false
Print(x == y);    //false
Print(y == z);    //true (actual ref's differ, but values are ==)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this fixed it: bool n = Nullable.Equals(null,node.prev); –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:20
    
Was node.prev actually a nullable type? You could have just gotten lucky because maybe the overloaded operator had an error, but the Equals override didn't. –  ricovox Dec 18 '12 at 19:23
1  
Node.Prev is nullable, yes, but it's type (Location) had a custom '==' operator, which couldn't handle null (not my code! :P), which caused the problem. –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:30
    
I think you mean that the Location type is "nullable" in the sense that it can set to null, but it isn't actually a Nullable<T>, right? Unless google uses alternate versions of the framework dlls, Nullable<T> is a struct which cannot be inherited. So there is no way Location could be a true Nullable<T>. –  ricovox Dec 18 '12 at 19:45
    
Since Location is NOT a Nullable<T>, I would avoid using Nullable.Equals. Instead use object.Equals to compare Node.Prev with null. If Node.Prev is a class (NOT a ValueType) it would be even better to use ReferenceEquals(Node.Prev, null) just in case Location.Equals(object x) method is overridden. I haven't checked, but my assumption is that Nullable.Equals will call object.Equals in the event that neither argument is a Nullable<T>. So your code probably WILL work fine, but a more correct answer would not use Nullable to compare objects that are not Nullable<T>. –  ricovox Dec 18 '12 at 19:52
show 4 more comments

The most likely problem is that node is null!. There is nothing about the foreach statement that would prevent node from being null, because in general an IEnumerable object (e.g. a list or collection) CAN contain null as a valid item.

No error would be thrown if previous is null (unless the node.prev class/struct overrides the == operator).

As others have mentioned, put in a test like this to verify:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
    bool n;
    try
    {
        if (node == null) 
        {
           n = true; //do something to deal with a null node
        }
        else 
        {
          n = node.previous == null;
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        StreamWriter s = new StreamWriter("error.txt");
        s.WriteLine(e.Message);
        s.WriteLine("-----------");
        s.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not the most unexperienced programmer, I've checked for node being null, it isn't in any case (that's why I was so sure). Fixed it thanks to ricovox: bool n = Nullable.Equals(null,node.prev); –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:24
    
Sorry for assuming you were a newbie :-) If you had mentioned the google challenge and that you had already verified that node wasn't ever null, that would have put your question in a different perspective :-) As it turns out, it seems like this was a pretty good test google used, because people don't often consider operator overrides, and they CERTAINLY don't expect those overrides to throw exceptions for common comparisons like (x==null). So it's definitely understandable that this error would cause some confusion! Good luck with the rest of the challenge!! –  ricovox Dec 18 '12 at 19:30
add comment

If nodes were null the exception would occur before the loop, and the exception wouldn't be caught.

Since the previous member is a simple field, the only possibility I see is that one of the node members of your nodes collection is null. You can do this:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
  if (node == null)
    throw new Exception("I told you so");
}

EDIT: OK, it turned out there was one possibility I didn't see, and that was a broken overload of the == operator. To make sure you call the usual overload, say:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
  bool n = (object)(node.previous) == (object)null;
}

(actually it will suffice to cast just one side of the == operator to object), or equivalently use ReferenceEquals:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
  bool n = object.ReferenceEquals(node.previous, null);
}

But you must fix the wrong implementation of the == overload.

If you had posted the stack trace of the exception in your original question, it would have been clear to most users here on SO that the exception came from a call to your == overload. So next time, inspect your stack trace.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I didn't notice that the try/catch block wasn't surrounding the foreach loop. Edited out of my answer. –  Eve Dec 18 '12 at 19:16
add comment

set a breakpoint at your line that starts with bool and verify that node is not null and that nodes is not null. My guess is that either nodes is null, or else it contains a null value if it's not a type-safe list.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not possible, as I don't have any debugging options (sorry for mentioning). This is for the AI challenge (Google), which uses a weird system which makes debugging impossible! I have checked for node being null, it isn't, at any point. Node.prevs could be null, but that shouldn't be a problem when comparing it with null, would it? –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:08
add comment

There's nothing that ensures that node is not null, since Node is not a value type. Mind giving more details?

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm 100% sure that node isn't null

But I'm 100% sure that an element in nodes is null! try this:

foreach (Node node in nodes)
{
    try
    {
        if(null == node) throw new Exception("This is not expected!");
        bool n = node.previous == null;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
        {
            if(File.Exists("error.txt")) File.Delete("error.txt");
            using(StreamWriter s = new StreamWriter("error.txt")){
            s.WriteLine(e.Message);
            s.WriteLine("-----------");
            s.Close();}
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Following code doesn't create an error message: bool n = node == null; if (n) { StreamWriter s = new StreamWriter("error.txt"); s.WriteLine("n == null"); s.Close(); } –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:14
    
@user1764970, so maybe the message is in file from before; truncate the error log file for each run please...I edited the answer to do this. –  Yasser Zamani Dec 18 '12 at 19:16
1  
I checked it for being null, it isn't ever (I've been programming for some time, believe me, it will not be null). It's fixed, turned out that Location had a custom '==' operator, which aparently didn't handle null very good, fixed it using the following: bool n = Nullable.Equals(null,node.prev); –  Delpee Dec 18 '12 at 19:26
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