Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to use real numbers as iterators and array indices when compiling with gfortran? Here is some example code:

program test
    real i
    real testarray(5)
    testarray = 0.
    do i=1,5
        write(*,*) testarray(i)
    end do
end program

I want to run some code that I did not write. It compiles fine with the intel compiler on windows, but I want to compile and run it in linux with the gfortran compiler. I'm currently getting errors using real numbers as array indices and do loop iterators.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I have code which has 1 loop which uses real numbers for iterating through a do loop (I have no idea what that loop does as I didn't write it myself). Anyway, gfortran compiles it just fine (but issues a warning every time) -- One of these days I might go in there an fix it though ... –  mgilson Dec 18 '12 at 20:06
add comment

3 Answers 3

Why would you want to use real numbers as array and loop indices?

If you need to use the real value of the index, do something like:

program test
    integer i
    real testarray(5)
    testarray = 0.

    do i=1,5
        testarray(i) = REAL(i)
    end do
end program

And of course you could go the other direction if you needed to,

integer j 
do j = 1, INTEGER(testarray(1))
...
end do

for example. The standard doesn't allow non-integer indices. They don't make sense either -- what is the 1.5 index in your array?

It appears that the real array indexing is an extension that should be possible if you compile with --std=gnu. But support for that may not always be there as it is not part of the standard.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not want to use real array indices. I simply have a pile of code, that I did not write and some of which is sloppy. It compiles and runs fine on windows using an intel compiler. I am just wondering if there is a setting for the gfortran compiler that might 'relax' it enough to run. Maybe I will have to go through and debug it all, but I was just wondering if there was an easy way to get it through the compiler since it seems to work fine with the intel one. –  Flux Capacitor Dec 18 '12 at 19:27
    
@FluxCapacitor I added something at the end, you can try the --std=gnu option but again, it's not part of the standard and shouldn't be expected to work. –  tpg2114 Dec 18 '12 at 19:28
3  
@FluxCapacitor And I also understand that you inherited messy code, but I don't want somebody to come along and think "Oh, I can use real array indexes in my code I'm writing? Awesome!" So I have to point out that it's a bad idea, even if unavoidable for you :) –  tpg2114 Dec 18 '12 at 19:30
add comment

If you don't want to see the warnings, then try --std=legacy. Otherwise "gnu", as already suggested. The gfortran manual states:

As an extension, GNU Fortran allows the use of REAL expressions or variables as array indices.

and

The default value for std is ‘gnu’, which specifies a superset of the Fortran 95 standard that includes all of the extensions supported by GNU Fortran, although warnings will be given for obsolete extensions not recommended for use in new code. The ‘legacy’ value is equivalent but without the warnings for obsolete extensions, and may be useful for old non-standard programs.

Using real variables as loop indices was deleted from the language standard with Fortran 95. Because of the amount of legacy code that uses this, it is likely to remain in compilers for decades.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Another possibility is to implement this as a function or subroutine. The user experience would be similar tab(x) loohs like an array or like a function, but would allow more control (for example you can check if x is within eps of some value of x0 for which you have defined a value).

In general the idea seems dangerous due to rounding errors.

If you are working on rational numbers or let say srqt's of integer numers, then it is again ideal case when f(x) as a function applies (with x bein e.g. a derived type that contains numerator and denominator).

So my final answer is: write it as a function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.