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I don't understand a behavior of javascript.

I'm doing a form validation of a jquery ui dialog. It seems then it's a javascript issue, not a jquery issue.

For the validation, I execute a function per fields that return true or false and a boolean variable recieve the result of successive && operator. Like this :

bValid = checkRegexp(validite, /^(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[\/\-](0?[1-9]|1[012])[\/\-]\d{4}$/, "Entrez la date de validit\350 sous la forme JJ/MM/AAAA." );
bValid = bValid && checkLength(libelle, "Libell\351", 1, 100 );
bvalid = bValid && checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250);

Here are, for information, the validation functions :

function checkLength( o, n, min, max ) {
    if ( o.val().length > max || o.val().length < min ) {
        o.addClass( "ui-state-error" );
        if(o.val().length == 0) { textError = textError + "le champ " + n + " est requis !\n"; }
        else { textError = textError + "Taille de " + n + " entre " + min + " et " + max + "caract\350res.\n"; }
        return false;
    } else {
        return true;
    }
}

function checkRegexp( o, regexp, n ) {
     if (!(regexp.test(o.val()))) {
         o.addClass( "ui-state-error" );
         textError = textError + n + "\n";
         return false;
     } else {
         return true;
     }
}

The behavior expected is that all the functions are executed and all the wrong fields are marked wrong with a concatenation of the error messages. For information, the bValid variable contains the boolean result of the successive && operators. This last point works ; no problemo.

The real behavior is that when a function return false, the following functions don't seem to be executed. The result is that only the first wrong field met is marked wrong.

Why ?

share|improve this question
    
After many reflections, I'm understanding why : Javascript must think : "why execute a function that will not change the final result ?" If 'bValid' is already false, it is not usefull to execute the function after &&, because the result will not change the value of 'bvalid' ! AND IF THE PROGRAMMER WANTS TO BECAUSE THERE ARE OTHER RESUTS TO APPLY, SILLY JAVASCRIPT ???? I DON'T ASK YOU YOUR OPINION !!! Excuse me, but I'm getting better now... lol –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 19:57
    
To get arround that, I choose to use numeric return values : it works like a charm... ^_^ –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 20:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because the && operator is 'short-circuited'. Meaning that since the compiler/interpreter/whatever knows that both sides operands for the && operator have to be true, if the first one is false then the second does not get executed.

If you want your function to execute for sure, just swap the order of the operands for &&:

bValid = checkRegexp(validite, /^(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[\/\-](0?[1-9]|1[012])[\/\-]\d{4}$/, "Entrez la date de validit\350 sous la forme JJ/MM/AAAA." );
bValid = checkLength(libelle, "Libell\351", 1, 100 )     && bValid;
bvalid = checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250) && bValid
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks !! I choose numeric values, but I also presume your solution same time. With numeric values, i can count the errors and change de heigth of the dialog dox according to the number or errors. But that && operator behavior was completly strange at the begining. –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 20:13

JavaScript uses short circuit evaluation. i.e. false AND anything is always false, so why bother doing the 2nd computation?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer ! –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 20:15

Let's reword this with actual output:

bValid = checkRegexp(validite, /^(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[\/\-](0?[1-9]|1[012])[\/\-]\d{4}$/, "Entrez la date de validit\350 sous la forme JJ/MM/AAAA." );
bValid = bValid && checkLength(libelle, "Libell\351", 1, 100 );
bvalid = bValid && checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250);

false = checkRegexp(validite, /^(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[\/\-](0?[1-9]|1[012])[\/\-]\d{4}$/, "Entrez la date de validit\350 sous la forme JJ/MM/AAAA." );
bValid = false && checkLength(libelle, "Libell\351", 1, 100 );
bvalid = false && checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250);

The moment it hits false it'll stop executing that conditional.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes ! I didn't know this behavior and it is due to optimization. Swaping operands was succesfull because the first operand is always executed. Thank you for your answer ! –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 20:19

Because Javascript will simplify and "optimize" ... if already the first operand of a dual && operation is false, the result will for sure be false so it won't execute the second part.

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Thanks for your answer ! –  Albiréo Dec 18 '12 at 20:16

It's called short-circuiting. The && can be considered logically as an "and-also" syntax where the second expression is not evaluated if the first expression fails. If you want the second expression to process regardless of the first, you may consider reversing their order or trying:

bValid = bValid & checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250);

Although, that is functionally equivalent to

bValid = checkLength(description, "Description", 1, 250);
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is just a typo, but its && not &, and in this case they are not equivalent because they are using the truth value from the previous line for bvalid –  Hunter McMillen Dec 18 '12 at 19:45
    
@HunterMcMillen: What is a typo? –  Joel Etherton Dec 18 '12 at 19:46
    
You have a single ampersand instead of two in your first line, which means bitwise AND. –  Hunter McMillen Dec 18 '12 at 19:47
    
@HunterMcMillen: You've misread my answer. I'm suggesting that he use the bitwise comparison (which doesn't short-circuit) instead of the standard comparison. Since both expression are boolean, the comparison will be fairly simple, but the bitwise comparison should behave as I've described above. –  Joel Etherton Dec 18 '12 at 19:49
    
My mistake I did misread that. –  Hunter McMillen Dec 18 '12 at 19:50

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