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After asking the same question 2 weeks ago here, I finally found "the" solution. This is why I am answering my own question. ;)

HOW TO BIND, UNBIND AND REBIND EVENTS IN JQUERY?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

And THIS is the perfect solution. (At least for me.)

$(document).on('click', 'a#button', function(){
    $(this).after('<span> hello</span>');
    $('span').fadeOut(1000);
});

$('a#toggle').toggle(
    function(){
        $(this).text('rebind');
        $('a#button').on('click.disabled', false);
    },
    function(){
        $(this).text('unbind');
        $('a#button').off('click.disabled');
    }
);

".on()" does it. NOTE: It is important to bind the event like you can see on line one! It does not work with .click() or …!

See the docs!

Here is a fiddle to try it and experiment with it!

Enjoy!

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Why did you repost it if you already answered it on your original question? – Kevin B Dec 18 '12 at 20:04
1  
I guess because the other solution is also nice and useful! (Updated the old post) – John Doe Smith Dec 18 '12 at 20:13
    
Great answer! This certainly helped me temporarily disable a button's click event. And, for additional emphasis, the context of the click event should be how it is shown in the above answer! – Con Antonakos Jul 22 '14 at 20:10
    
Question: why does this work? Are we enabling/disabling a 'disabled' property on the native click event? – Con Antonakos Jul 25 '14 at 18:30

This function extends jQuery to include an operator that attaches event handlers the same as .on. Additionally it prevents more than a single instance of a given handler from being attached to the selector(s).

Be aware that removing and reattaching event handlers changes the order that they are attached. You can see this behavior in this fiddle.

(function ($) {
    $.fn.reBind = function(events, handler) {
        return this.off(events, handler).on(events, handler);
    };
}(jQuery));
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A simpler and short solution is to add a class to the object if you want to unbind it then remove this class to rebind ex;

$('#button').click( function(){
   if($(this).hasClass('unbinded')) return;
   //Do somthing
 });

$('#toggle').click(function(){
    $('#button').toggleClass('unbinded');
 });
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